The Found Boat By Alice Munro

819 words - 4 pages

“The Found Boat” by Alice Munro is a story about five teenagers that learn to explore and have a sense of freedom after finding a boat washed ashore after a flood. The boat becomes a common ground used between the characters to become closer friends and explore things in the world around them. This boat that they find gives these kids a new found form of freedom and they embrace that.
When the boat was initially found by the girls the boys didn’t see it at first, after they find it they become closer friends and this newfound friendship takes the teenagers on an adventure. They not only find a boat and fix it but they also use this boat to guide them into a new territory with the ...view middle of the document...

Or else they just leaned against the fence while the boys worked on the boat. During the first couple of evenings neighborhood children attracted by the sound of the hammering tried to get into the yard to see what was going on, but Eva and Carol blocked their way (PG #356) The girls are given small tasks, where the boys don’t think that they would be capable of fixing it on their own.
In The Found Boat there is plenty of irony. The irony in The Found Boat is situational and dramatic. The girls are constantly switching between hating the boys and wanting to hang out with them.
The boat that is found in the story symbolizes freedom. “I dare everybody,” said Frank from the doorway. “ I dare—Everybody.” “What?” “Take off our Clothes.” “ Anybody who won’t do it has to walk—has to crawl—around this floor on their hands and knees.”(PG#359)
The boat is used to explore relationships and closeness while working together to achieve a common goal between the characters.
Another form of symbolism I found in this particular story is the difference in the role of the male and the female. – He turned to Eva and held out the pot and said, “You can go in and heat this on the stove.” Eva took the pot...

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