The Genre Of Stoker's Dracula Essay

9602 words - 38 pages

This is almost like an epic poem. The theme in this case is of good
versus evil. The evil has almost supernatural powers yet the good
triumph over it. The good consists of ordinary men, god fearing and
courageous. They are consistent in their effort to stamp out evil. In
the end they triumph over evil even though the evil is very strong.
This theme slowly and steadily gathers momentum until it becomes
clearer in the end.

In Dracula, Bram Stoker emphasizes how as the daylight ends, the
horror begins, for from the depths of the swirling mist, he (Dracula)
appears, his pointed teeth gleaming as he edges towards his victims.
This is Count Dracula the King of the Un- dead - the dreaded vampire.
Centuries old, he walks the earth to quench his insatiable thirst for
the blood that gives him life.

STYLE

The style of the author is simple, in a narrative manner the story of
Dracula unfolds. Stoker is almost autobiographical in context, where
he projects himself into all of the major characters of Dracula. His
family is thrown into the hued characters of the book and bristles
with repression, apprehension of homosexuality, devouring women and
rejecting mothers. The style is vastly descriptive especially the
physical aspects. His style especially the sexual tension in the
scenes not only titillates with its potential for homo-erotic union,
but also arouses the characterî–¸ hidden wells of sexuality and fantasy,
which were earlier unspoken of amongst Victorians.

Stoker exposes the sexual aspect of the book by making the women (the
three women vampires) usurp the male prerogative of initiating sex. It
shatters the myth that only fallen women can experience ecstasy. The
stalking of Lucy violates the taboo on depicting passionate
intercourse ending in orgasm. Yet, Stoker does not show real sex,
there is no lovemaking. Stokerî–¸ genius was to develop a coded
eroticism covering it in the supernatural, and then shrug off all
social responsibility by obliterating the authorî–¸ voice.

1. Introduction
In this paper I will examine Stoker′s novel Dracula in order to
determine whether it belongs to the Gothic genre or not.
Firstly, a short history of the Gothic novel will be presented and the
most important authors and works of the era will be mentioned.
Furthermore, the different characteristics of the Gothic genre will be
examined in order to compare them with Stoker′s work. Aspects like
nature, surroundings, atmosphere, the role of the women in the Gothic
novel, the Gothic villain, will be compared with the elements found in
Dracula.
Another question that will have to be answered is, what makes Gothic
novels so attractive. The breaking of certain taboos is essential to
accomplish this atmosphere of danger and fear, and it will be examined
whether Dracula contains any of...

Find Another Essay On The Genre of Stoker's Dracula

Stoker's Portrayal of Women in "Dracula"

1295 words - 5 pages Similar to almost every piece of literature ever created, Dracula by Bram Stoker has been interpreted many different ways, being torn at from every angle possible. Just as one might find interest in interpreting novels differently, he or she might also find interest in the plot, prose, or theme, all of which ultimately lead to the novels overall tone. Throughout the novel, it becomes blatant that the novel contains an underlying theme of female

An Analysis of Bram Stoker's Dracula

1055 words - 4 pages Bram Stoker’s Dracula is the story about how the small company of men and a woman lead by Professor Abraham Van Helsing combats against Count Dracula, who moves from Transylvania to England in order to manipulate people as “foul things of the night like him, without heart or conscience, preying on the bodies and the souls of those [they] love best” (223). Stoker employs an epistolary format in this novel and nowadays, Dracula becomes one of

Dracula, Appropriate Halloween Icon? Examines the theme of sexuality in Bram Stoker's "Dracula" and what it implies about Stoker's view of sexuality.

872 words - 3 pages Although the legend of the vampire has existed, in one form or another, for centuries, Bram Stoker's Dracula is credited with having exposed this legend to the masses. The novel has given rise to the stereotypical character that the world associates with gothic events - Halloween in the U.S. - due to its dark, supernatural characterization. However, as compared with Stoker's novel, an element of the character generally ignored contributes

Comparing the Nature of Terror in the Gothic Novels, Bram Stoker's Dracula and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

702 words - 3 pages The two Gothic novels, Dracula and Frankenstein, introduced two of the most terrifying characters throughout all of literature. Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula, and Mary Shelley, the author of Frankenstein, both present elements of terror and create a tense mood and a gruesome picture. In both of these novels the other characters are not able to see these evil creatures actions. Although both of these novels depict truly evil minds, Dracula

The Gothic Tradition in Stoker's Dracula and Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray

2382 words - 10 pages The Gothic Tradition in Stoker's Dracula and Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray Gothic Literature was a natural progression from romanticism, which had existed in the 18th Century. Initially, such a ‘unique’ style of literature was met with a somewhat mixed response; although it was greeted with enthusiasm from members of the public, literary critics were much more dubious and sceptical. Gothic writing is a style of literature that relies upon

Money - The True Force Behind Braham Stoker's Dracula

891 words - 4 pages Money - The True Force Behind Dracula      In Dracula (1897), Bram Stoker explores the "wonderful power of money" (Stoker 341). Through the actions of Van Helsing and the "Army of Light" Stoker ponders "What can it not do when it is properly applied; and what it might do when basely used!" (341) through Dracula's machinations. Though one does not usually associate a vampire with a bank statement, Dracula utilizes the power of money as

Getting to Know the Un-Dead in Bram Stoker's Dracula

1934 words - 8 pages Dracula, as it was written by Bram Stoker, presents to us possibly the most infamous monster in all of literature. Count Dracula, as a fictional character, has come to symbolize the periphery between the majority and being an outsider to that group. Dracula’s appeal throughout the years and genres no doubt stems from his sense of romanticism and monster. Reader’s no doubt are attracted to his “bad-boy” sensibilities, which provide a sense of

Discuss the presentation and role of Mine in Bram Stoker's "Dracula", considering the historical and social context of the novel.

1049 words - 4 pages In many ways, Dracula is more than just a thriller. It explores, among other themes, issues of sexual repression and the conflict between the old and new. Stoker presents Mina as the model Victorian female: she is dutiful to her husband, pure and chaste, and sympathetic. Furthermore, she exemplifies the Victorian ideals of progress, technological advancement and rationality. As such, she is key to the conflict between old and new (the irrational

the mind of dracula

830 words - 3 pages institution for injecting rabbit's blood into his veins and contracting blood poisoning. Chase escaped from the hospital and ran home to his mother where he was then placed into a hospital for the criminally insane. During his time there, the staff once found him with blood all over his mouth. it was then that he was given the nickname "Dracula". "After undergoing a battery of treatments involving psychotropic drugs, Chase was deemed no longer a danger

The Genre of Folktales

1196 words - 5 pages exactly distinguished them from the other genres. The most important characteristics of folktales are their unknown origins and anonymous settings. Overall I really enjoy the genre of folktales. I most especially enjoy how each and every story is it’s own. In other genres the plot seems to follow the same path with every story. A fresh plot is always nice when discovering new, and interesting stories. Folktales are important to some for their

The Narrative Method of Dracula

1629 words - 7 pages The word ‘monster’ derives from the Latin words ‘monere’ and ‘monstrare’. ‘Monere’ means to warn against something, while ‘monstrare’ means to show something. If these two origins are put together, the word ‘monster’ obtains the meaning of something that is shown to warn. In relation to Dracula, this would allow a whole series of question from what makes Dracula a monster to what does he warn the reader against. In this essay I will mainly deal

Similar Essays

The Use Of Secondary Sources In Bram Stoker's "Dracula"

648 words - 3 pages know the character’s thoughts, emotions, or anything they were feeling at that moment. The person telling the story wouldn’t be able to tell exactly what was going through the character’s head; they would only be able to give an overview. In “Use of the Diary Form Narrative in the Novel Dracula,” the author states that, “this was a good choice of how to write the novel since it was very beneficial to the plot.” I agree with this statement, because

Coppola's Adaptation Of Bram Stoker's Dracula

1168 words - 5 pages Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula      The legendary creature Dracula has mesmerized readers and viewers for nearly a century. In Bram Stoker's masterpiece, Dracula, the infamous monster affects each reader in a different way. Some find the greatest fear to be the sacrilegious nature of his bloodsucking attacks, while others find themselves most afraid of Dracula's shadow-like omnipresent nature. The fascination with Dracula

A Marxist Interpretation Of Bram Stoker's "Dracula"

816 words - 3 pages A Marxist reading is one which interprets history as a series of class struggles. Marxists believe that, within a society, people think and behave according to basic economic factors. These factors are derived from the dominant class imposing their beliefs on the lower classes in order to make them conform to the standards and beliefs of the dominant class.Bram Stoker's novel, 'Dracula' represents a class struggle not between the bourgeois

A Summary Of Bram Stoker's Dracula

963 words - 4 pages A Summary of Bram Stoker's Dracula Dracula is an epistolary novel, meaning that is composed from letters, journal and diary entries, telegrams, and newspaper clippings. Jonathan Harker, Mina Murray (later Mina Harker), and Dr. Seward write the largest contributions to the novel although the writings of Lucy Westenra and Abraham Van Helsing constitute some key parts of the book. The novel has a slightly journalistic feel, as it is a