This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The God Of Small Things: Lessons Of History

1921 words - 8 pages

Time and space have always posed a threat to all creative artists. To move with time is the easiest way. To move back and forth is also not impossible. But to be timeless and space less- this is the real challenge. Yet any artist worthy of his vocation has in one way or another tried to resolve this riddle. How far he has succeeded is the real test of his genius. It does not simply mean neglecting the concept of linear time. Rather, it is all about a timeless and universal appeal of the human element the work contains.

The author of The God of Small Things is, at the very outset it is clear, very keen on not being held up by the question of time. The novel is set in a timeless and, one dares suggest, spaceless dimension. The subtle irony in the introduction of the time element should not be missed. It all began with the arrival of Sophie Mol at Aymenen- that is, `for all practical purposes, in a hopelessly practical world'. Why should a writer who is basically pre-occupied with things other than purely practical make such a clear-cut beginning for the human drama she is about to unfold?. The reason soon becomes clear when she mentions another way of looking at the time factor. It is as old as when the Love Laws were written. That is, who should love and how. And how much.

Estha and Rahel, the two-egg twins of an unhappy marriage of Ammu's at Calcutta are eight when it all began and thirty one when the drama is done- the same age when Ammu died. Not old, not young `a viable die-able age'. Baby Kochamma too has to tell the story of a lost love with the Irish Priest Father Mulligan, which never came to anything more than a far away and distant dream. Her aborted attempts to tie herself to him ended in a stern vow of celibacy. Rev. Father Ipe, who was blessed by the Pope directly, could do nothing to it. Papachi has his own irredeemable loss of not being acknowledged the discoverer of his moth, which, to his utmost despair was named after a subordinate of his who didn't deserve it. A Royal Entomologist's loss. His despair finds vent in his regular beatings of Mammachi, till one day Chacko puts the decisive break to it, following which the old man symbolically murders his rocking chair. Baby Kochamma is reduced to her dish-antenna addiction, supported by Kochu Maria the maid servant, gardening being too short a respite for thwarted love.

Chacko had his love in London when he was an Oxford student. Margarette was a hotel waitress, intent on supporting herself. The romance was impossible to last long for Chacko could never fit himself even to a basic minimum tidiness in life as Margarette would have it. Margarette finds her soul-partner in Joe while she has conceived Sophie Mol. The divorce is inevitable and Chacko remains just Sophie Mol's biological father. But Joe meets with an accident and dies, leaving for Margarette `a Joe-shaped hole in the universe'. Sophie Mol is eleven when she comes to Aymenem, to her...

Find Another Essay On The God of Small Things: Lessons of History

The God of Small Things: A Plot Summary

1770 words - 7 pages Although desire presents itself in many charged forms in The God of Small Things, we can view the plot of the narrative as a series of disrupted yet connected events that are propelled by, or a product of, individual resistance fuelled by a Desire to Transgress. This plot of individual resistance is represented through the female protagonist Ammu and her daughter Rahel, as a foil of her mother, and is most explicit in the ending of the novel

The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

2647 words - 11 pages The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy In The God of Small Things the twin’s mother, Ammu, breaks the laws that lay down ‘who should be loved, and how and how much’ when she has an affair with Velutha (an Untouchable). A relationship with an Untouchable is inconceivable in India, even today, as a woman would be expelled from her Caste if she were to carry out such an undignified act. Before this occurs Ammu is already frowned upon

Unique Cultures in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart

1995 words - 8 pages Unique Cultures in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things and Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart     There are a variety of cultures in this world and each culture is unique. Usually when one was born and raised in a certain culture, that person may adapt to that culture for a period of time. It is sometimes difficult to look into someone else’s culture, and understand their culture. Sometimes one must keep an open mind, study the culture

The Oppression of Colonized India Illustrated in Arundhati Roy’s Novel The God of Small Things

1527 words - 6 pages should lie. In Arundhati Roy’s novel “The God of Small Things”, the Kochamma family is a family of tragic situations and tragic people. Not all of their problems stem from colonization; in fact it is their own cultural traditions that lead to much of the tragedy; however it can be argued that the underlying theme within the novel is one of a people oppressed by the colonization of India by England, and how a society already consumed with

"The God of small things": reflection, caste system, boundaries and barriers, hierachy, partiarchal society - letter format

1305 words - 5 pages Dear Velutha,I recently read The God of Small Things, by Arundhati Roy and was awfully touched by your story. Before I started reading The God of Small Things I knew very little about Indian society and history and consequently I found many of the themes and ideas of the novel intriguing as well as confronting. I was amazed to discover what a significant role the Caste System plays in Indian society and I was astounded by the negative impact is

Corporeality Gender and Race Positioning: The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

2823 words - 11 pages smile. Police boots stepped back from the rim of a pool of urine spreading from him, the bright bare electric bulb, reflected in it (319-320) Velutha is the extreme transgressor of rules. So he is “abandoned by God and History, by Marx, by man, by woman and by children” (310) He pays the price of disobedience. He is referred to as ‘The God of Small Things’. The Big Things being poles apart from each other, The God of Small Things is bound to be

Exploring Boundaries in The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy

896 words - 4 pages In The God of Small Things, Roy explores the idea of breaking boundaries by personifying the setting, focusing on everyday events, and manipulating the characters within society. The most predominant boundary in the novel remains the rigid social classes known as the caste system in Indian society. Roy gives each character a specific role to bring out the importance of the Love Laws, which set behavioral margins within the society. In chapter 1

Taboos and Love Laws in "The God of Small Things" by Arundhati Roy

2193 words - 9 pages carries a considerable societal or legal punishment. In her novel, The God of Small Things, Arundhati Roy explicitly depicts numerous transgressions against taboos and what she identifies as the "Love Laws", both specifically cultural and universal.All cultures and societies have taboos that do not extend across the world. Western culture has many prohibitions that are perfectly acceptable in other societies. For example, both police corruption and

Self-Interest as a Driving Force in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things

1726 words - 7 pages Self-Interest as a Driving Force in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things is a novel about how people’s pursuit of their own interests, influenced by the cultural and social contexts in which they live, ultimately determines their behavior. Through utilizing subthemes of self-preservation, the maintenance of social status/the status quo, and power, she portrays Velutha as the only wholly moral character

Forbidden Love in The God of Small Things written by Arundhati Roy

1072 words - 4 pages This essay focuses on the theme of forbidden love, The God of Small Things written by Arundhati Roy. This novel explores love and how love can’t be ignored when confronted with social boundaries. The novel examines how conventional society seeks to destroy true love as this novel is constantly connected to loss, death and sadness. This essay will explore the theme of forbidden love, by discussing and analysing Ammu and Velutha's love that is

Imagined Communities in the God of Small Things, No Telephone to Heaven, and Burger's Daughter

1162 words - 5 pages sense of self identity, then how is it possible for Rosa to imagine herself as a member of any one community? The complication in this instance lies Rosa's struggle to escape her father's overbearing shadow. The last novel to be examined here is Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things. I would argue that it is the issues of class in this particular novel that complicates the imagined community which in this case would be the city of Ayemenem

Similar Essays

The God Of Small Things Essay

964 words - 4 pages Describe the main features of Roy´s writing and show how they are effective. "And the Air was full of Thoughts and Things to Say. But at times like these, only the Small Things are ever said. The Big Things lurk unsaid inside" (p.136) "The God of Small Things" Since the title of the novel is read, the invisible thread connecting the first page with the last one is presented. The whole book deals with the significance of things that appear

The God Of Small Things Essay

1221 words - 5 pages ruler. They have to obey the laws set up by the government. So, theirs lives are actually controlled by the foreigners and theoretically, they are properties of the foreign ruler. I think that colonial rule will create inferiority complex among the colonized people. Evidences can be found in the book "The God of Small Things". The book is set in India. India was defeated by Britain many centuries ago and then became a British colony

Arundhati Roy’s The God Of Small Things

1384 words - 6 pages society. In the novel “The God Of Small Things”, there are three generations of women. Each of them was born and raised under different circumstances. Each of them was born and raised under different circumstances. Starting from the oldest generation, there is Mammachi, then the generation of Ammu, and the youngest generation is Rahel. These women live according to the prevailing customs of Hinduism. Susan Wadley and Doranne Jacobson conclude that

The Manifestations Of Marxism In The God Of Small Things

815 words - 4 pages Arundhati Roy’s novel The God of Small Things presents the reader with the realities of Marxism. Roy gives the reader an impression of three possible manifestations of the ideology, rather than presenting a biased reading for or against Marxism. Through Roy’s novel the reader comes to understand Marxism as it appears through Velutha, the oppressed worker, Chacko the Marxist-in-name only, and Comrade Pillai, the corrupt politician. Comrade