The Gold Rush In Alaska And Yukon

1505 words - 6 pages

GOLD FEVERThe Klondike Gold Rush was the greatest of the eleven gold discoveries in the northern territories of Alaska (USA) and Yukon (Canada) between 1861 and 1899. Since the Klondike showered the stampeders (people who took part in the Klondike gold rush) with the most gold, it attracted a lot of prospectors (people who searched for gold or other precious metals). Prospectors from the United States of America and Canada went up north in hopes of striking the mother lode (the main vein of ore or gold in an area where many smaller veins of gold are found). Of the 100,000 stampeders from USA and Canada who set out for the Klondike gold rush in Yukon, only half arrived, only 400 found gold, only a few hundred had found enough gold to be considered rich, and only a couple had invested their money wisely. Luck, intelligence, following the law, complying with the Yukon Code, and sometimes deceit, were the weapons and the allies of a successful person in the Gold Rush.Robert Henderson, George Carmack, Skookum Jim and Tagish Charlie were the lucky ones who began the Gold Rush. In the early summer of 1896, Henderson and some other prospectors had taken $750 worth of gold from a creek Henderson named Gold Bottom. During that summer, he met George Carmack, a white man who had adopted the natives' lifestyle, and his friends Tagish Charlie and Skookum Jim. He told them about his discovery, because of the Yukon Code (the unwritten code among the prospectors): when someone found an unusual amount of gold, he should share the good news with other prospectors. When the three said that they would stake some claims at Gold Bottom, Henderson objected because of the three were Siwash (what prospectors named the natives in the Yukon area, and anyone adopting the manners and customs of those natives.). The three were insulted.Three weeks later, when the three went to Gold Bottom to see if the gold looked promising, they met up with Henderson. They were insulted once again when Henderson refused a large some of money for a little bit of provisions, which they needed desperately. The three then headed for Rabbit Creek, where Jim discovered a bonanza (a large or rich mineral deposit). They decided to file the Discovery Claim under Carmack's name after Carmack claimed that naïves weren't allowed to claim, but it was not entirely true. Because of Carmack's lie, he became the richest of the three.Carmack told the town about his discovery, and when word spread, hundreds of prospectors went to Bonanza Creek (Rabbit Creek was renamed, for the obvious reason) to stake their claims. Soon after that, Joe Ladue, a prospector, found another bonanza at Eldorado Creek, which rendered even more gold. This Creek produced millionaires, like Mcdonald (twenty million), Charley Anderson ($1,250,000), and Thoman Lippy ($1,530,000) who became legends of the north. During all this time, Carmack didn't send word to Henderson, who was working on the other side of the mountain, about his...

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