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The Golden Girl: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

1292 words - 5 pages

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby introduces the roaring twenties with a series of golden prosperity and riches beyond belief. With his eccentric chraracters, Daisy Buchanan, Tom Buchanan, and Jay Gatsby, Fitzgerald shapes the perception of 1920’s New York and shows the unique social aspect of life in the east. The Buchanans are initially portrayed as the power couple. Both desirable in their own way, Tom is INSERT QUOTE OF WHAT HE’S LIKE CAUSE IDK HE’S AN ASSHOLE and Daisy is utterly beautiful and enchanting. The Buchanans, unfortunately, are more broken than they seem. With the arrival of Jay Gatsby into the story, conflict ignites as Gastby and Tom attempt to win over the beloved golden girl, Daisy Buchanan. all Through the characterization of Daisy Buchanan and her individual relationships with Tom Buchanan and Jay Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald illuminates the conflicting gender roles in society and thus highlights the ideals of feminism.
Fitzgerald introduces Daisy Buchanan as the “golden girl” in the novel. She is magnetic and alluring to the men around her—her beauty truly reinforces her status and reputation of wealth (Fitzgerald). Her name, “Daisy”, compares her to that of a flower with “a gold center and white petals”, thus portraying her radiant beauty and presenting her as the “princess dressed in white” (Weshoven). The symbolic meaning behind her name shows that she is valued for her beauty. To further enhance the physical appearance of Daisy, Fitzgerald associates her with “the color white, which is the color she always wears” in order to imply that she is someone “insubstantial” and “ethereal.” ("Overview: The Great Gatsby.") Fitzgerald uses this representation to portray the unequal standards of men and women in society. By showing that Daisy is only desired for her beauty, Fitzgerald emphasizes the low standards women had in society. The strong characterization of who she is based on her appearance shows how women were judged on their beauty not their personality. Daisy’s past also characterizes her and shows how she is only valued for nothing but her physical appearance. “Through the twilight universe Daisy began to move again with the season; suddenly she was again keeping half a dozen dates a day with half a dozen men…” (Fitzgerald). Daisy’s beauty is magnetic and alluring to men. Men did not desire her because of her intelligence or personality. Fitzgerald actually never draws any attention to Daisy’s inner beauty. Aside from her “beautiful face and enchanting body”, Daisy is shown to be a “hollow woman, and empty character.” (Overview: The Great Gatsby). “She is portrayed as typical of the women of her social class and stats of the period.” ("Overview: The Great Gatsby."). Daisy’s treatment and perspective of her daughter further employs the inequality women had in society. Daisy hopes that her daughter will be a “little beautiful fool” when she grows up for “the best thing a girl can be is a little beautiful fool.”...

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