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The Grapes Of Wrath: Connections To The Great Depression

1573 words - 6 pages

The Grapes of Wrath: Connections to the Great Depression

The decaying state of the American economy and the onset of the Great Depression in the 1930s brought about the necessity for the United States to reconsider its attitudes and examine the long term effects of its policies concerning wide-scale socioeconomic problems that were constantly growing bigger. The Great Depression led to the creation of many new and innovative government policies and programs, along with revisions to older economic systems. However, these cost the government billions of dollars in a country that had consistently been stretching the gap between the rich and poor. This continued as the Great Depression began to change everything people had grown old knowing, and it forced everyone to deal with dramatic alterations to their lives that left them with no options except acceptance. America then witnessed the mass migration of farmers from the Dust Bowl out to the west towards California and the required intervention by the federal government in stepping up and taking responsibility for the socioeconomic issues plaguing the disintegrating nation. This was profoundly illustrated throughout John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath.

The incredibly unequal distribution of wealth that took place throughout the 1920s managed to grow even worse during the Great Depression and the 1930s. Despite how there was technically a very small fraction of people that were financially stable, there was a gigantic underclass in the U.S. that had practically nothing. "During the worst years of the Depression, 1933-34, the overall jobless rate was twenty-five percent with another twenty-five percent of breadwinners having their wages and hours cut. Effectively, then, almost one out of every two U.S. households directly experienced unemployment or underemployment." Hence, there were barely any Americans that were able to benefit from the economic progress/advances of the 1920s.The administrations of presidents Warren Harding, Calvin Coolidge, and Herbert Hoover and their policies of laissez-faire that they sincerely supported played a significant part in influencing the financial gap between the American people. They all favored big business and the wealthy who chose to invest in these companies, not the common man. "Andrew Mellon, Coolidge's Secretary of the Treasury, was the main force behind these and other tax cuts throughout the 1920's. In effect, he was able to lower federal taxes such that a man with a million-dollar annual income had his federal taxes reduced from $600,000 to $200,000" In 1923, the supreme court had even ruled minimum-wage legislation unconstitutional. So, the aftermath of the Great Depression yielded that many middle-class citizens and few of high financial standing lost everything they had. The already monumental lower-class was unceasingly multiplying. Although of course, there was the small number that managed to remain wealthy, but not always through fair and...

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