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The Great American Cigarette Essay

1827 words - 7 pages

The cigarette is one of the biggest causes of death on the planet ranging from it many diseases that it causes to the effects that it psychotically a person. With smoking being dangerous by it secondhand smoke and peer pressure succumb to people’s minds and thoughts to go and do these awful things.
The Cigarette is looks simple but in reality it is engineered piece of death according to Hyde who says” A cigarette looks simple: just a paper wrapped around some tobacco, but todays cigarettes is a very carefully engineered nicotine delivery system”(Hyde 17). Also the cigarette holds” Cigarette smoke contains over seven thousand chemicals, sixty-nine of which causes cancer” (Smoking ). some may ask themselves if something so ridiculous and causes death who made it or who got the great idea to mass produce it but in reality no one knows” No one really knows exactly when people started to use tobacco for pleasure, but early use to be very limited. Some experts say tobacco was used as long ago as eight thousand years ag.”(Hyde 74). People started to recognize that smoking was bad as soon as 1604 by King James I who said” Smoking is a custom loathsome to the eyes, lateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lung, and in the black stinking fumes thereof”(Hyde 71). Smoking is one of the biggest death percentages in the United States with more deaths then HIV, illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injuries, and fire related incidents combined also the amount of deaths from smoking is ten times as much as all the wars the United States has participated in all together (Health Effects of cigarette smoking). The amount of smokers in the United States alone is a gigantic number with “In 2009, and estimated forty-six million or twenty point six percent of adults were current smoke.”(Smoking). this number is staggering and just going way over then it should be especially with the amount of cigarettes that are being produced a year by tobacco companies in the US alone is at four billion five hundred and ten million cigarettes a year but were only in second China is producing over sixteen billion four hundred thirty million a year (Hyde 86). In dotel article about smoking and sports is a good article because it captures the extremely horrifying images smoking has especially on sports” when Mike Keenen arrived to coach the Blackhawks in 1988, he noticed something disturbing in his teams dressing room at Chicago stadium: ashtray.”(Dater 1) Most death just come to people like car crashes or illnesses that come onto a person but this are completely random and god choose when these happen we do not have control of what happens but with smoking we control how we approach the problem by quitting, smoking less, or all together not even smoking at all. In the US “smoking is the leading preventable death in the United States” (Health Effects of cigarette smoking).
The effects of smoking are always the center of attention, everyone wants to know...

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