The Great Depression: Social Programs And The Recovery Of Us Economy

3273 words - 13 pages

Imagine an uncomfortably crowded street, littered with damp cardboard boxes assembled into make shift homes. A chilling wind blowing from the north slowly freezes the damp boxes as they are now painfully covered in snow. These destitute streets once were filled with children laughing any playing, perhaps in another time they would have enjoyed the snow. But sadly now the sounds of laughter have been replaced with an eerie silence as the sick and hungry fill the streets. You might imagine this scene in some third world country ravaged by war.
Unfortunately, this was due an economic crash of epidemic proportions. Prior to the stock market crash of 1929, the American Industrial Revolution in the late 1800’s forever changed the way of life. A once agrarian society, thriving on agriculture and the raising of livestock, was now changing into a more economically based culture. The growth of this new economic development gave birth to capitalism. High paying jobs in the city seemed to offer a better way of life, as many Americans began to move from these rural communities to nearby cities.
Life seemed to get easier, and the progression of this economic development led to the roaring twenties, which was a prosperous time and life seemingly could not get any better. After the economic meltdown, of the stock market crash, many of Americans who once had a sense of financial stability were now scrapping for food; this was not the result of a shortage of food but rather a lack of finances necessary to purchase food.
As with any species populations tend to fluctuate over time. The growth and decline of a population seems to be dependent on the inherit carrying capacity of the environment. Studying these trends gave rise to two prominent theories on population growth and the carrying capacity of the environment, in which a given species lives. In regards to human populations, both theories seem to be more relevant to the time they were proposed than to present day. While population growth seems to be on a decline in America and increasing technological advancements seem to have made this notion of breaching this carrying capacity no longer relevant, as the overabundance of food seemingly grows exponentially. It is more than obvious that problem in America is neither a shortage of food or over population, but rather, which social groups are increasing in population and the financial means to provide for them.
According to an article published by David Kline, in 1944 the U.S. Coast Guard began an unintentional social experiment on population growth and the carrying capacity of an environment. During WWII, The U.S. Coast Guard set up on outpost on St. Mathews Island. Their purpose was to communicate with ships and aircraft in order to aid them in locating each other. The living conditions on the island were dire, and the food sources on the island were meager, with the exception of an overabundance of lichens. In light of the conditions...

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