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The Great Gatsby And The American Dream Of The 1920’s

724 words - 3 pages

If the American Dream is the hope of attaining success, Jay Gatsby of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby by all appearances achieved the American Dream. If success is equal to materialism, then Gatsby was indeed successful. He used his display of wealth and possessions to gain the approval of his true love Daisy Buchanan. Some would argue, however, that this does not represent the American Dream accurately, but is a warning of how materialism can lead to the downfall of individuals and societies. “The Great Gatsby proves to be of both literary and philosophical significance as it explores deep questions of both the 1920s United States and human beings as a whole.” (tycary, from website ...view middle of the document...

Because she was born into a wealthy family, Gatsby pretended himself to be from “old money,” …”Gatsby was overwhelmingly aware of the youth and mystery that wealth imprisons and preserves, of the freshness of many clothes, and of Daisy, gleaming like silver, safe and proud above the hot struggle of the poor.” (F. Scott Fitzgerald in The Great Gatsby, Chapter 8) What is sad about Gatsby’s charade is that he truly was a self-made man, driven by the American Dream, even though he gained his wealth in undesirable ways. He had hope that he could become successful enough to deserve Daisy’s love. “He concentrated all of his life on winning Daisy back.” (James Tophan from website Classic Literature) The irony is that Daisy proves herself to be just another socialite undeserving of Gatsby’s love. The narrator of the story is from the mid-west and money does not impress him. He sees the whole lot of shallow party-goers and fake friends for what they really are. Interestingly, he is the only character that acts like a true friend to Gatsby and tries to tell him, “They’re a rotten crowd…you’re worth the...

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