The Great Gatsby Critical Essay

929 words - 4 pages

America is based on dreams, from those of its creation to those of today. Yet one Anonymous dared to say, “The American Dream is dead.” That no longer is it possible for one person in America to acquire their dream, whether it be wealth, prosperity, happiness or any goal that with enough determination and ability can be achieved. It is erroneous to believe as such when there is so much left to uncover, build, develop, expand and acquire as shown in books and in life when we see that the future is a blank slate. The limit to what can be done has not been reached yet. In The Great Gatsby written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, a fiction drama, we see it when we observe New York City in the 1920s. There, in its boisterous environment, the setting, attracting everyone like moths to its flame to culminate dreams, hopes, and the future which goes against the quote. Not only that but we also see it in the plot of the story, though the theme of the story seems to be that the American dream is impossible to achieve, that there is a dream at all being chased refutes the saying. The Great Gatsby’s plot and setting allows us to observe that dreams are always a constant of life as long as there are humans, desire and the capabilities to achieve.
The Great Gatsby shows through the setting of New York City that dreams are not dead. The setting, the time and place where a story is placed, which is New York City is first introduced as the place where people go to, it being the center of the world, when they are restless as Nick is. The age in which it is based is one of miracles, of change, of extravagance and excess. Such a location is the perfect place to dream, to imagine. We see New York harbor the beginnings of the Jazz genre, we see it develop the economy bigger and better, we see the increased independence of women when the flappers appear, all of which grows from desires, from dreams for more. Not just the main characters in the book but all of the people who provide the thought that New York is the place to dream at. Where the lights shine the brightest and where but you stretch your arms and the stars are the closest, and even then you go on reaching, the setting which says that. Then we also have the setting of West Egg. West Egg is of the newly rich, and though it may be materialistic and hollow, being rich used to be a dream of theirs once, now gained. That in itself proves that there are dreams in The Great Gatsby that are achieved and have some value (no...

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