"The Great Gatsby" Analysis Of The Relationship Between Tom And Daisy.

755 words - 3 pages

Throughout the novel, The Great Gatsby, it was evident that Tom and Daisy had an unstable relationship. Both Tom and Daisy come from wealthy backgrounds and the upper echelon of society. Tom is a small man hiding in a big hose with an equally large ego. Daisy is a hospitable character who is forever in love with having a rich and lavish lifestyle. Though big, strong, and arrogant, Tom still shows that he cares a little bit for Daisy.Tom and Daisy’s main commonality is money. Daisy did not marry Gatsby even though they were in love because he was poor (82). She and Tom were in love at one point as well but he had the money to provide her with the lifestyle she was accustomed to. Daisy is very selfish and materialistic. When Jay Gatsby invites Daisy and Nick over to his house he shows them all of his expensive shirts. When Daisy sees them she starts crying and says, “They’re such beautiful shirts. It makes me sad because I’ve never seen such beautiful shirts before” (98). Someone who cries because of nice materialistic goods is very superficial and that is definitely Daisy’s nature. Tom and Daisy are similar in this way because Tom is very concerned with his image. Enough to try to uncover the history and truth about his wife's lover, Gatsby, and openly embarrass him for it (141). Tom is so desperately an empty man that he believes he can define himself with exterior belongings. He is trying to find his identity by looking for happiness in nice cars money and a good woman even though it he has to cheat on his wife to do so. To look even richer, he tells Wilson that the yellow car that he is borrowing is his when it is actually Gatsby’s (130). Both Tom and Daisy have similar characteristics and attitudes towards money. Nick points this out when he says, “retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together…” (188). Tom and Daisy were not only concerned with the money, but everything that went along with being wealthy. Both of them do not have respect for anyone below...

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