The Green Knight And King Arthur

1805 words - 7 pages

The Green Knight and King Arthur

Many British literature writers of the Middle Ages wrote about reality of the Middle Ages including the social, political, and economical styles of writing. During the Middle Ages, chivalry was a big aspect of every day life. Chivalry, a word not rarely used in modern times anymore in the same fashion it was before, is defined as, "the code of life that defined the qualities of knighthood, such as honor, courage, loyalty, and willingness to defined the weak and protect women." (English & Western Literature Text) The Middle Ages were known to be the times of knights, kings, and queens and fighting for their country for pride for the king. Loyalty was a major part of chivalry and thus was a part of many stories about the King Arthur era. One story in particular, "Le Morte d'Arthur" compiled by Sir Thomas Malory, shows many characters throughout who appear to be loyal to the king and queen of their country.
Loyalty is shown through many instances from the beginning of the story to the end. All three knights, namely, Sir Torre, Sir Pellinore, and Sir Gawain, all reveal their loyalty through different actions and emotions. But in the introduction, before Arthur becomes King, King Uther was sick. In this instance, Merlin, the advisor, summons the Kings noblemen to take care of him. They did as they were told and did not back out because they loved their king and felt loyal to him unto his dying day. Unfortunately, King Uther dies and his son, Arthur comes into the picture. When the news of the great stone in the rock came to everyone the noblemen wanted to win the prize and to become king of the land. One of them was Sir Kay, the brother of Arthur, the song of Sir Ector, whom asked Arthur to retrieve his sword since it had been misplaced or so he told him. "In order not to disappoint his brother, he rode on to St. Paul's, determined to get for him the sword which was lodged in the stone." (p.118) This states that Arthur did not want to back out since he was doing the deed for his brother out of pure loyalty for him. He tugged the sword without trouble and successfully was made king with some trouble from others who wanted to be king. The others who tried but failed, did not believe that someone so young could succeed the throne instead of them. They did not have any loyalty towards Arthur at first, which put off the crowning for a while but not until Arthur successfully again retrieved the sword out of the stone did the others bow down to him. They were finally going to become loyal to their real king; King Arthur. "The nobles, knowing in their hearts that the commoners were right, all knelt before Arthur and begged for forgiveness for having delayed his succession for so long." (p.120) This quote tells the reader that the nobles begged for their forgiveness by kneeling down before him in search of becoming loyal again.
In the second part of this story, it describes many adventures of...

Find Another Essay On The Green Knight and King Arthur

Sir Gawain and The Green Knight

2388 words - 10 pages . The legendary King Arthur and his court in Camelot are the center of Arthurian legend that defined the chivalric code that was followed for centuries in Europe by knights. Arthurian legend through stories such as Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, defined the chivalric code and exemplified its uses throughout its plot. Even before the men in these steel suits knew these characteristics, Arthurian legend was developed in its earliest stages. While

Sir Gawain and The Green Knight

2044 words - 8 pages . The Green Knight is drawn to these chivalric qualities of the court which appear to give them a sense of authority. Being the court of King Arthur, there is a responsibility to protect the entire kingdom, and to also keep up an image of chivalry. The very act of the Green Knight challenging the court of Arthur serves as an assault on the institution of knighthood and chivalry and also brings forth Gawain into focus of the story. The Green

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

1088 words - 4 pages time" (21 - 24). Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is just one of many stories surrounding these "bold boys" from the original land of the Arthurian legends. "The story is set in Camelot, the court of the legendary King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table, during an extraordinary Christmas celebration. The court is relatively new, and the nobles of the land are still young. During this celebration, a strange, supernatural knight boldly

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

1993 words - 8 pages respect whatsoever for all the knights in the court. In addition, King Arthur is very childish himself, "but Arthur would not eat till all were served; so light was his lordly heart, and a little boyish" (Norton, 204). Thus, having such a weak leader, there is a perfect excuse for the Green Knight to look down upon the court. He feels that the knights in the hall are a shame to the code of chivalry because their power and ability are simply overstated

"Sir Gawain and the green knight"

789 words - 3 pages Knight, the lesson learned and the conclusion. What seems to tie all this together is the fact that the entire ordeal was completely manipulated by Morgan Le Fay, who hates King Arthur and all of Camelot.The story begins at the New Years Eve Feast taking place at King Arthur's Court in Camelot, England. All the knights and lords and ladies sit happily around their king, who just refuses to eat until his childish demand fulfilled. Suddenly his

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

1320 words - 5 pages , disrespectfully rides into King Arthur's court and challenges the king to a Christmas game -- a beheading contest. Sir Gawain, a young, brave and loyal knight of the Round Table, acting according to the chivalric code, takes over the challenge his lord has accepted. The contest states that Sir Gawain is to chop off the Green Knight's head, and in one year and a day, the antagonist is to do the same to the hero. The whole poem is constructed in a

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

565 words - 2 pages Sir Gawain and the Green Knight utilizes the convention of the French-influenced romance. What sets this work apart from regular Arthurian or chivalric romances is the poet's departure from this convention. The clearest departure takes place at the resolution of the piece as the hero, Sir Gawain, is stricken with shame and remorse rather than modest knightly pride, even after facing what appears to be certain death and returning to his king

Sir Gawain and The Green Knight

1466 words - 6 pages In the Pearl poet’s Sir Gawain and The Green Knight, an epic talk emerges to reveal a man’s journey of honesty, morals, and honor. Sir Gawain accepts a challenge in place of his uncle King Arthur, with hidden tests and viable consequences. As Gawain begins his journey, he proudly upholds his knightly honor and seeks out his own death; however, Gawain gives into his human emotion and is soon distracted from his chivalrous motives. As a result

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight - 603 words

603 words - 2 pages admiration of all. Sometimes, the main character becomes a hero by overcoming some force within his or her own self. In Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, this is ultimately what Gawain must do in order to be considered a hero. Sir Gawain is originally faced with the challenge of the Green Knight. The Green Knight appears in King Arthur's court and causes a disturbance, issuing an open invitation to all in the court "to strike one stroke for

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

2131 words - 9 pages Green Knight when he first enters King Arthur's court and the description of Sir Gawaine's imminent departure on the quest to find the Green Knight, will show their distinct entities and the opposite roles they have assumed in the "beheading game", essential to the development of the story line. Furthermore, the poet also places emphasis on armor, particularly the shield Gawaine uses; an analysis of this will confirm that accouchements are valued as

Sir Gawain and The Green Knight

1623 words - 6 pages Sir Gawain and The Green Knight Summary The story begins in King Arthur's court, where he and the Knights of the Round Table are celebrating New Year's. While they are enjoying their feast, a gigantic Green Knight rides in on a green horse with an immense axe in his hand to offer them a challenge. His offer is: "I shall bide the fist blow, as bare as I sit…….., but in twelve month and one day he shall have of me the same." (Norton

Similar Essays

Sir Gawain And The Green Knight 1962 Words

1962 words - 8 pages Sir Gawain and the Green Knight - Character Analysis of Sir Gawain "The Wedding of Sir Gawain and Dame Ragnell" is a medieval romance poem written by an anonymous author. Sir Gawain is one of the major characters in the poem. He is a very likable personality. Sir Gawain represents an ideal knight of the fourteenth century. Throughout the story, we see Sir Gawain portrayed as a very courteous and noble knight, always trying to help King Arthur

Sir Gawain And The Green Knight

1082 words - 4 pages Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Sir Gawain Faces Temptation      Sir Gawain was known as a noble and honest man who was willing to stare death in the face to protect King Arthur. However, the courtly Sir Gawain is submitted to the unexpected—not to the test he expects, but to one he does not expect (qtd. in Spearing). The underlying theme throughout the entire poem is temptation, which, is Sir Gawain’s greatest

Sir Gawain And The Green Knight

804 words - 3 pages Sir Gawain and the Green Knight is a tale spun from the Legends of King Arthur and his knights of the round table. Typically intended to inspire lessons of chivalry and humility, Sir Gawain’s story follows the road paved by previous Camelot accounts. In thoroughly providing an analysis of this story one must first determine the plot, followed by the metaphorical use of illustration and imagery, which the storyteller employed in order to reveal

Sir Gawain And The Green Knight

1183 words - 5 pages Green Knight. He has come to realize his own imperfection, recognizing his own weakness in himself when he decides to play the Green Knight?s game.In the beginning of the poem, a green knight enters King Arthur?s home and court; daring anyone to play his game. As no one stands up to try, the green knight begins to mock their reputation, taunting the knights and King Arthur. ?What, is this Arthur?s house, the honor of which is bruited abroad so