This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Handmaid's Tale By Margaret Atwood Prompt: Compare How Different Characters In The Novel Adapt To Life Under The New Regime. (Full Title Below)

668 words - 3 pages

We lived, as usual, by ignoring. Ignoring isn't the same as ignorance, you have to work at it." Compare how different characters in the novel adapt to life under the new regime."The Handmaid's Tale" is a novel by Canadian poet, Margaret Atwood. This book illustrates a dystopian society where men are represented as powerful and self-sufficient, and women as servants. Men are defined by their ability in the 'military' (Guardians, Commanders and Angels), while women are named solely for the purpose their bodies can serve. Under this new government, citizens of the Republic of Gilead had to adapt to this new way of life.The protagonist of this novel, Offred, is a handmaid. She is a uterine slave, her only purpose is to be impregnated by her commander and bear his children. Shorn of her name, her family, and her past, Offred is forced to adapt to her new life under this new rule. Forbidden to read or write, and constantly spied on, the only free place Offred has is her own mind. She uses this tool to escape and ignore the troubles of her new life. Offred would often think of her past; memories of her husband, her daughter, her family and friends. Sometimes, she would even "script arguments with Luke, and our [Offred and Luke's] reconciliation after". These memories are the driving force for Offred to carry on, her hope for a reconciliation one day, and they make Offred's days bearable. Offred never gave up hope, she never thought of Luke being dead. She hoped her daughter was alive and was reassured when Serena Joy showed her a picture of her daughter. These restrained Offred from committing suicide when given the chance more than once. When Serena Joy confronts Offred about her affair with the Commander, Offred even thinks of things she could do to escape punishment.Serena Joy is the wife of Offred's commander. She was, in the days before Gilead, a gospel singer on TV. Elderly and crippled by arthritis, Serena Joy is a...

Find Another Essay On The Handmaid's Tale - by Margaret Atwood Prompt: Compare how different characters in the novel adapt to life under the new regime. (full title below)

Vision of Feminism in the Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

1228 words - 5 pages Feminism in the novel The Handmaid’s Tale written by Margaret Atwood is a prominent theme. This novel represents the morals and horrors of a vision of feminism, which is sometimes taken to the extremes. Women’s rights have been downgraded and as a result of this women are used to bear children and are constantly watched by the eye. The Handmaids are considered powerful figures in the novels’ society while living in a dystopia of cultural

How are the main characters in "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood constructed to represent the text's underlying values and attitudes?

1514 words - 6 pages Fictional writing is rarely a neutral account; typically, characters are constructed to express a particular viewpoint. How are the main characters in "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood constructed to represent the text's underlying values and attitudes?Fictional texts are rarely constructed to present a neutral account; instead authors construct their texts to represent particular viewpoints. These viewpoints are manifested through the

Critical Analysis Of 'The Handmaid's Tale' By Margaret Atwood

1052 words - 5 pages The creation of Offred, the passive narrator of Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale, was intentional. The personality of the narrator in this novel is almost as important as the task bestowed upon her. Atwood chooses an average women, appreciative of past times, who lacks imagination and fervor, to contrast the typical feminist, represented in this novel by her mother and her best friend, Moira. Atwood is writing for a specific audience

The Presentation of the Commander in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

793 words - 3 pages The Presentation of the Commander in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood The commander can be seen as a man torn between two worlds, he was one of the founders of Gilead yet still enjoys and yearns for the pleasures of the old society he managed to break. It can be seen as ' he has made his bed and now he must sleep in it'. The commander is cool and collected on the surface but underneath he is bitter and corrupted

Heros in Gilgamesh by David Ferry and Offred The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

961 words - 4 pages on her own. In conclusion, there are many different types of heroes. Some are powerful and mythological, others are achievers and still others are just the main characters of a book. Gilgamesh of Gilgamesh by David Ferry and Offred of The Handmaid's Tale byMargaret Atwood are both heroes in their own light. Gilgamesh was a powerful ruler who befriends a rival. Offred was a passive woman who with the help of others was able to escape her society.Works CitedAtwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. New York: Random House, Inc. 1998.Ferry, David. Gilgamesh. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1992.

Symbolism and Loss of Identity in The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

932 words - 4 pages individual identity, a theme present throughout the novel. Still others like smell or hunger convey the atmosphere&emdash;both physical and psychological&emdash;in Gilead. Whatever their different purposes may be, the symbolic devices achieve the same result: they enlighten the reader on dangerous social tendencies and compel him/her to take action in order to prevent the outcomes they depict. Works Cited Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Anchor Books: New York, New York, 1985.

This essay compares the treatment of women in the novel Handmaid's Tale (Margaret Atwood), and the country Afghanistan

743 words - 3 pages countries such as Afghanistan. The author (Margaret Atwood) has created a novel, which can be considered a fictional interpretation to the harshness of society in Afghanistan toward women.From the opening chapters of The Handmaid's Tale we catch a glimpse into the overwhelmingly harsh society that is Gilead. The narrator Offred, explains that she is held at a guarded facility, where the violation of basic human rights would be an understatement

The theme of power and control as demonstrated through The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood

2232 words - 9 pages It is necessary for the government to impose a certain amount of power and control on its citizens in order for a society to function properly. However, too much power and control in a society eliminates the freedom of the residents, forbidding them to live an ordinary life. In the dystopic futuristic novel, The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood demonstrates the theme of power and control through an oppressive society called the Republic of

The Handmaid's Tale - Margaret Atwood Discuss the Gileadean concept of "Freedom to, freedom from"

1318 words - 5 pages America in the 1980's to save it from its declining birth rate and high levels of moral corruption. The protagonist of the novel, Offred, documents the history of the two contrasting societies as she recounts with both sentimentality and clarity, the images and memories of her past life as an American women and those of her present life living under the Gileadean regime as a Handmaid.What is most apparent throughout the novel, is that of Margaret

The Handmaids Tale, by Margaret Atwood

880 words - 4 pages In Margaret Atwoods ‘The Handmaids Tale’, we hear of one women’s posting ‘Offred’ in the Republic of Gilead. A society based around Biblical philosophies as a way to validate inhumane state practises. In a society of declining birth rates, fertile women are chosen to become Handmaids, walking incubators, whose role in life is to reproduce for barren wives of commanders. Older women, gay men, and barren Handmaids are sent to the colonies to clean

The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood

989 words - 4 pages “The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any”-Alice Walker. What this quote really means is that people are hopeless and they don’t realize on what they could do. They only focus on what’s going to happen next and about their safety, but they don’t notice that they are giving up their power to the government, leaving them powerless. Margaret Atwood examines power and peoples attempts to control each other

Similar Essays

"The Handmaid's Tale" By Margaret Atwood

1764 words - 7 pages Atwood, Margaret. The Handmaid's Tale. Toronto: McClelland-Stewart, 1985, Seal Books edition 1998In "The Handmaid's Tale" one of the main themes is the influence of government. All areas of peoples' lives are controlled by the government, which is a totalitarian regime. The government in Gilead rules with the political concept that the citizen should be totally subject to an absolute state authority. The state in this case believes (or at least

"The Handmaid's Tale" By Margaret Atwood

1528 words - 6 pages English LiteratureThe Handmaids TaleWill society ever reach a point where it is considered the 'natural norm' by all, and therefore unable to undergo further change? It is impossible to imagine that such a point could ever exist, as all people would have different belief, values and expectations according to their past experiences. In The Handmaid's Tale, by Margaret Atwood, the oppressive Gilead regime enforces their new ideals on the

The Handmaid's Tale By Margaret Atwood

623 words - 2 pages In Margaret Atwood’s, The Handmaid’s Tale, our eyes are open to an oppressive society of which seems to be the near future. Widespread sterility has led to the rich controlling young women of childbearing age, who are called “handmaidens”. The tale is narrated by Kate, also known as “Offred”, her handmaid name. She relates her struggle throughout in the most vivid of ways. The struggle around her: the oppressive Republic of Gilead, and the

The Handmaid's Tale By Margaret Atwood

661 words - 3 pages In The Handmaid’s Tale, much use is made of imagery; to enable the reader to create a more detailed mental picture of the novel’s action and also to intensify the emotive language used. In particular, Atwood uses many images involving flowers and plants. The main symbolic image that the flowers provide is that of life; in the first chapter of the novel Offred says “…flowers: these are not to be dismissed. I am alive.” Many of the flowers