The Harsh Lives Of Renaissance Children

1262 words - 5 pages

The Renaissance era was a very grim time to live in, mostly for the children. Their well-being, education and future were something that was often jeopardized by everyday factors of life. Their parents were not really there for them, they were more focused on other more important matters. Many children today believe that they live harsh lives and that their parents do not care for them, but if they were to travel back decades ago and live the lives of The Renaissance children, their outlook might alter. The children of Renaissance had everyday lives of poverty amongst a society pyramid. There was no “moving up” or “upgrading”; whichever economic family you were born into, was the family you died in. Everything, which is a gift now, is a struggle to obtain during that era; such as schooling. Education was very limited for middle class and poor children (royal youth received a little more than their pupils beneath their standing). Since their earliest age (such as ten through twelve) adolescents were expected to be “young little adults”. There was not much of a childhood for them since adulthood was rushed so quickly into their young lives. The youth born into the Renaissance era lived the harshest of lives than any other generation; their childhood and schooling were the major contributors to it. They strived to meet the expectations of adults. While struggling to live in a day to day unfortunate life and attempt to enjoy the fun of being a kid when they had the chance.
“Parents. They are the key source in every child’s life” (Lesko). The parents (or guardians) who lived in The Renaissance Era were not the best parents. They were not very close to their kids as they grew up. The time that was probably considered “bonding”, was the time spent teaching their kids their future careers. Fathers usually taught their sons skills to benefit them, mostly if there was a family trade. “Perhaps childhood is so overlooked in the Middle Ages because it was so short” (Hughes). Young boys started working very early in age. The fathers spent their time showing them how to work. The boys faced very hard labor at home and never wanted to disobey their fathers out of the fear of physical punishment. Adolescent girls grew up very fast also. Mothers would teach their daughters how to be the perfect housewives. Girls were married at a very young age, and every family wanted their daughters to marry into a rich family name. Young women during this time had a very rough childhood. Knowing they would be forced to marry someone they might not like or know at all. Also knowing they could die very easily bearing a child. “Most children began to do serious work once they reached puberty, at around 12-14.Sometimes this was done at home, assisting in agricultural work or a craft, but it was common to send children away from home at about the age of puberty to be servants to other people”(Orme). Each gender had their life problems, and there was no “talking about” or resolving...

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