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The Heroine And Archetypal Characteristics Of The Little Mermaid

878 words - 4 pages

In the story, “The Little Mermaid” there are demonstrations that describe what a heroine is. A female character that is noted for special achievements represents the heroine in a story. Therefore, the youngest mermaid “Little Mermaid” represents the heroine throughout the story. The Little Mermaid is a mystical creature that longs only to seek the handsome prince she laid eyes on. “Once she became human, the witch said she could never become a mermaid again” (Anderesens 185). This is an example of how the Little Mermaid chose to do something incredible and dangerous just to accomplish something she only dreamt of. Not only is the Little Mermaid the heroine of the story, but she also exemplifies other archetypal characteristics. An original type, after which, other related things are patterned in a story embodies an archetypal characteristic. “The Little Mermaid danced for the Prince to show her affection” (Anderesens 185). Love has conquered her soul and has made her this affectionate creature. The Little Mermaid plays an essential part in the story, giving her the most significant role, and making her the main focus.
The understanding of the heroine in this story is imperative and helps the reader apprehend the overall theme and purpose. Early in the story, the first example of heroine actions is presented by the Little Mermaid rescuing the Prince. “When the Little Mermaid found the Prince, she carried him to the surface and laid him on the sand, kissing his forehead before swimming away from the beach” (Andersens 184). The Prince faced a near death experience, and if not for the Little Mermaid, his life would have been cut short. This is only one example, but throughout the story the Little Mermaid signifies the heroine with the validation of her achievement to venture out and make the Prince hers. With a sip of the potion her tail would disappear and she would gain two legs, but yet she loses her beautiful voice. “The Little Mermaid swam to the Princes palace, sat on his steps, and drank the magic potion” (Anderesens 185). No matter what the risk might be, the Little Mermaid will do everything and anything to achieve her goal. She would only be granted a human soul if a human loved her with all his heart and married her. “The Prince married someone else, the Little Mermaid would not get a human soul, and she would turn to foam of the sea”(Anderesens 185). Everything the Little Mermaid had could be lost in a blink of an eye, but she did not think about the consequences. She thought only of what could...

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