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The Horrors Of War Depicted In Owen's "Dulce Et Decorum Est" And Yeats' Poem "An Irish Airman Foresees His Death"

792 words - 3 pages

It is clear when a country goes to war, patriotism and support for ones’ country is obvious. After events of nine eleven, there were large amount of support given to soldiers fighting in Iraq. Banners, stickers, rallies were some ways people showed their gratitude. Little do they know, many of the strong men, who are in battle, goes through an episode where they fear death more than anything else. In the writings of William B. Yeats and Wilfred Owens, their war poems depicts an emotional load that they have encountered, to a point where death was no longer a fear but a desire.
War is not a pretty sight. On the battle field, what is seen, felt and heard isn’t fully comprehensible unless one experienced it first hand. Owen’s writing, “Dulce Et Decorum Est”, vividly describes the horrid war that he was in. Owen begins his poem by placing the reader in the environment that he was in. Lines such as, “men marched asleep”, “coughing like hags”, “haunting flares” and “limped on, blood-shod” were effective at conveying an emotional appeal. The conditions that the soldiers were in were horrific. In Yeats poem, “An Irish Airman Foresees His Death”, the writing was not as graphic as Owen’s. Yeats’s was an airmen of his home village, the Kiltartan Cross. The first four verse put the reader in a nonchalant mood because the verses tells the reader how he felt. Yeats was more neutral when it came to the war. His enemies he fights against he doesn’t hate and the people who he fights for, he doesn’t love. Most soldiers would feel differently. Fighting for your country brings honor and dignity among yourself. Yeats did not feel that way at all. All he knew was somewhere among the clouds, death was lingering. In the midst of the haunting darkness, treacherous sounds and dying soldiers, the fear of death was no longer the issue for Owen and Yeats. The war has taken such an emotional toll, to where death was a motivation to get out.
War is painful. Soldiers are put in a lot physical and mental extremities. Owen and Yeats were mentally suffering from all the commotion. In verse 15-17, Owen...

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