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The Huck In Everyone, The Way Readers Of A Ll Ages Respond To Reading The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain.

2091 words - 8 pages

As a boy sits down and begins to read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, he is unaware of the remarkable journey upon which he is about to embark. He sits down and begins the first page, "You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter (Twain 1)." He thinks; he wonders how good this book will be with improper English. This scenario happens quite frequently around the world. Readers of all ages pick up The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn for the first time or maybe their tenth time; whichever it is, they all begin to read one of the most difficult works of literature to understand. The novel is a common choice in many high school English curriculums. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has been translated into many different languages. Huck Finn's adventures are fun for the young people to fantasize and fun for the older reader to remember. This book is written so that a young child would be able to read it and understand it, but it is also written for the higher level of literary interpretation. The school children learn how the same piece of literature can be viewed at many different levels. The book is difficult for the elementary students because of the dialects, but the storyline keeps their interest. The high school students are able to handle the difficult dialect and discover some of Twain's ironies and metaphors that are embedded in the storyline. Many critics feel this was one of Samuel Clemens' greatest novels, while some feel this novel was very demeaning and horribly written. It is surprising why a great piece of literature can be so well written, but also be so poorly written.Mark Twain began to write The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in 1876."Twain narrates the adventures of boys, with a primeval and RobinHood freshness, he has broadened his canvas and given us a pictureof a people, of a geographical region, of a life that is new in the world.The scene of his romance is the Mississippi River. Twain has writtenof this river before specifically, but he has not before presented it tothe imagination so distinctly nor so powerfully (Hartford Courant 2)."Twain uses real characters he knows or has seen in his novels. He writes about real events and real things from everyday life. Twain does not imagine much, but he uses memory (Bradley 4). Throughout the novel, Twain develops his characters based on real life observations.Twain wrote The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in three parts. The first chapters came easily to Twain; the words kept flowing from his pen to his paper. He wrote four thousand words a day for six or seven days and then took a day off (Paine 4). "In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, there is no more "comic copy," no straining after effect; one might almost say that there was no waste word (Bradley 4)." After writing about half of his manuscript, his life became busier than usual. When Twain made the transition to the second part, it...

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