The Hunts Versus The Lady And Gawain

890 words - 4 pages

Part Three of Gawain and the Green Knight tell about the three days before Gawain is to leave the Lord’s castle to meet the Green Knight. The first day the lord wakes up early to hunt for deer. The story tells in detail about the hunting party when suddenly we move to the castle back to Gawain. Gawain asleep in his bed is greeted by the lady of the castle sneaking into his room and watching him sleep. Gawain knows she is in his room but acts surprised to wake up to her. The lady flirts with Gawain by telling him how great he is and offers her body to him. The author writes “My body is here at hand, / Your each wish to fulfill; / Your servant to command/ I am, and shall be still.” (Lines 1237-1240). Gawain tells her he is unworthy of her to which the lady continues her flirtatious ways. Before the lady leaves Gawain’s room she asks for a kiss to which Gawain complies and grants her a kiss. The lord’s hunting party has killed a large amount of deer and begins dividing the killings. The party returns home and Gawain is given the game, Gawain gives the lord the kiss he received but refuses to tell who gave him the kiss.
The second day the lord and his hunting party chase down a huge, vicious boar. Men and dogs are harmed during the chase. Back at the castle Gawain greets the lady as she enters his room, the lady is more flirtatious and as their conversation continues. She continues flirting with Gawain and praises his reputation in Courtly Love. The author writes “Thus she tested his temper and tried many a time, / Whatever her true intent, to entice him to sin, / But so fair was his defense that no fault appeared, / Nor evil on either hand, but only bliss they knew.” (Lines 1549-1553). Gawain escapes her flirting again with only two kisses being exchanged this time. The lord is still hunting the boar, the boar is finally cornered and the lord spears it through the heart with his sword and the game is divided between the hunting party. Again Gawain is given the game and the lord receives two kisses from Gawain. The lord tells Gawain to stay a third day, with the same deal to exchange one another’s winnings. He says darkly: "For I have tested you twice, and true have I found you; / Now think this tomorrow: the third pays for all; / Be we merry while we may, and mindful of joy, / For heaviness of heart can be had...

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