The Concept Of Reflexivity Essay

2375 words - 10 pages

Seifeldin Soliman Advanced Writing in Disciplines Final DraftUnit Four: Investigating learning transfer: Reflexivity in actionAn Essential ReflectionDear Professor Noonan,The most challenging aspect of this project was understanding the concept of reflexivity. Qualley's passage explaining the concept guided me through what it was exactly. Although I wasn't well acquainted with the concept at first, I quickly realized that there were many instances in which I have been reflexive. While reading about the concept of reflexivity there seemed to be a fine line that separated what it meant to be reflexive versus reflective. The difference between the two is seemingly minimal, however the more I read about Qualley's experience I understood that the outcome of reflexivity is far more significant and substantial. Before progressing to speak about a time in which I have been reflexive it was important for the development of my thoughts to distinguish and define the difference between reflexing and reflecting. From my understanding, there are three key details that highlight the difference between the two concepts.The first detail is that reflexivity "does not originate in the self but always occurs in response to a person's critical engagement with an other" (Qualley, 11). This is fundamentally important to the concept of reflexivity because it emphasizes the fact that being reflexive is a result of a social interaction with other individuals rather than simply generating thoughts with yourself. The second detail involves the manner in which the thinking travels. Qualley explains to us that "reflection is a unidirectional thought process" whilst on the other hand "reflexivity is a bidirectional, contrastive thought process" (Qualley, 11). This point is noteworthy because it shows us that in reflection there is no exchange of thoughts or in other words thoughts are only traveling one way. On the contrary, in reflexivity thoughts are traveling back and forth, there is an exchange of thoughts with someone else or as Qualley explains there is an encounter with "new information or perspectives" (Qualley, 12). The final detail, which is also important to the understanding of the concept, is that "Reflecting does not require the presence of others. One can reflect all by oneself" (Qualley, 17).As I reflected about a moment in which reflexivity took place, I quickly realized that there have been several moments of reflexivity for me. However, there are two instances that stand out most. The first opportunity of reflexivity took place within this course. The existence of this course, especially the online version of it, created a discourse community, which allowed for dynamic interactions among the students. In my opinion, I have interacted with other students' thoughts more than ever by taking this online class. It is the interactions with the thoughts of other students that allows for reflexivity to take place. This precisely refers to Qualley's quote:...

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