The Importance of a Role Model in The Adventures of Huckberry Finn by Mark Twain

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“The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me” (Twain 1). The role of a parent is important in a person’s life, as they learn the acceptable way to live their lives, and even how to act spiritually. As people begin to grow up, they remember the traits and guidelines given by their guardians, and use them to establish their own beliefs and shape their actions. In the novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain exemplifies the influence of morals and religion that the Widow Douglas teaches young Huck and he returns to throughout the novel.
Mark Twain begins by describing Huck staying in the Widow’s home and conforming to the social norm of civilized behavior he says he “was getting sort of used to the widow’s ways, too, and they warn’t so raspy on me” (Twain 19). Huckleberry is beginning to appreciate the lifestyle of the widow. He begins to like his education, and the love that he receives from the woman. He learns how to be a more respectable human being as he sees the goodness of the Widow’s ways, but as the good characteristics begin to appear they are hindered by the maleficent aspects of his poor initial upbringing. Huck recounts "Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the Widow to let me. But she wouldn't. She said it was a mean practice and wasn't clean, and I must try to not do it anymore" (Twain 2). The Widow passively attempts to control Huck and force him to conform to the society that he has been attempting to avoid by sneaking away. The idea of smoking represents all the things that Huck use to do in his old life, however the things that are comfortable to Huck are not accepted by the world, and society endeavors to remove the controversial subject or make it change to fit with their views. Mark Twain establishes this belief as Huckleberry Finn is whisked away from society by his drunkard father and locked inside a shed were he will not be discovered by the townspeople. However, although Finn tries to return to his old ways of carefree living that he had before the Widow he is constantly aware of the rules and societal norms that she has taught him. When Huck first stumbles upon Jim on the island and Jim confesses he has run away from the Widow because he was afraid he would be sold, Huck states, "Well, I did. I said I wouldn't, and I'll stick to it. Honest injun I will. People would call me a low down Abolitionist and despise me for keeping mum- but that don't make no difference. I ain't agoing to tell, and I ain't agoing back there anyways. So now, le's know all about it" (Twain 55). Huck realizes the consequences that could come from not turning Jim in because of the time he spent inside the home of the Widow. Although Huck does end up disregarding the Widow’s teachings he first considers the penalties that might result from the decision. Jim belongs to the Widow Douglas, thus Huck must decide between the affect that society has on the actions of a young boy and a his own integrity....

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