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The Importance Of Criminal Investigation In The Law Enforcement

713 words - 3 pages

All my life growing up I’ve heard police stories from my grandfather and uncle about good guys catching bad guys. Police work isn’t always so black and white like I thought when I was a kid, Sometimes you have to work with the bad guys to catch the “badder” guys.
The use of confidential informants is a valuable tool to many law enforcement agencies and more importantly for crimes associated with narcotics. Informants have the ability to gather information that would otherwise be unable to gather from law enforcement personnel. However, many of these informants are criminals associated with the crime being investigated
Criminal investigation may be a terribly troublesome and dangerous operation of police work. Once a criminal offense happens, a police officer goes to the scene of the crime, gathers information, and searches for for the potential suspects. If in case, there are witnesses to the crime; criminal investigation becomes easier because the suspect is know. Downside arises once the cops don't have any witnesses to the crime and there's no physical proof found within the crime scene which will link the suspect to the crime scene. The case even becomes a lot more difficult once the crime has no victim or plaintiff if no one is willing to offer info or testify against the suspect. In these instances, the officer will have to be compelled to consider its huge resources to assist them get the duty done. One amongst these resources is that the police informants.
As mentioned earlier informants play a crucial role in accordant crimes or narcotics, illegal drugs and any other crimes involving organized syndicates. Police informants are thought of to be very important within the government’s battle against drugs. This can be as a result of dealings involving drugs are conducted in secret. Law enforcement officials cannot simply raise questions to the public concerning people that handle drugs. They’d want people that are associated with drug syndicates. Most of the time these individuals hired by law enforcement officials to try and do the dirty job are members of the drug syndicates themselves who are already caught...

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