This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Significance Of Language In Dramatic Productions

2043 words - 8 pages

The Significance of Language in Dramatic Productions The significance of language in any dramatic production, or indeed any
piece of performance art, be it song, poetry or whatever, is
undoubtedly of great importance, as it is not only the medium through
which ideas, thoughts, emotions etc. are communicated, but also sets
the scene in regards to style, feeling, mood and tone, an
understanding of which ought to lead to greater appreciation of the
work in question. In his Poetics, Aristotle prescribed that the action
of a play be “made pleasurable” “in language”, (Aristotle: p10). He
also states that “The most important quality in diction is clarity,
provided there is no loss of dignity”, (Aristotle: p36). These
instructions however, may apply quite reasonably to almost any other
kind of drama, (at least up until its emergence), but can easily be
argued to have lost all authority over the kind of dramatisation that
falls under the heading of the Theatre of the Absurd, where pleasance,
clarity and dignity frequently fall by the wayside.

In an arena where the traditional theatrical objectives of
representing reality through long-established stage conventions
regarding plot, character development, use and structure of language
etc. have been all but abandoned, the role of language has been not so
much redefined, but rather has been stripped of any clear, distinct,
exclusive working definition or suggested structure, so that it
becomes less of an explanatory accompaniment to the action portrayed,
and more of a secondary aspect, to be scrutinized and considered in
its own right. The term “Absurd”, when used to describe such works as
Waiting for Godot, refers to the originally musical term,
‘discordant’, or ‘out of harmony’. The turning on its head of
language, not only of its function and usefulness, but also of its
very structure and composition, to a point where it no longer serves
to communicate clearly and unambiguously the thoughts of the writer,
(or even the action on stage, as these may or may not be the same), to
the audience, or even confuses, through outright, even deliberate
contradiction, the action taking place, points to this discordance and
lack of harmony, and is one of the features that determines the work
of not only Samuel Beckett, but of other dramatists among his
contemporaries, as belonging to that category which is known as
Theatre of the Absurd.

The apparent ‘discordance’ of what is said, and what actually happens
can be seen throughout Waiting for Godot, most notably at the end of
each act where our two main protagonists decide to leave, only to stay
where they are, as at the end of act I,

...

Find Another Essay On The Significance of Language in Dramatic Productions

The Dramatic Effectiveness and Significance of Act 3, Scene 1 in Romeo and Juliet

1416 words - 6 pages The Dramatic Effectiveness and Significance of Act 3, Scene 1 in Romeo and Juliet Shakespeare’s second tragedy ‘Romeo and Juliet’ was written between 1594 and 1596. The play is set in Verona a city in the north of Italy. In the play it is portrayed as a small independent country. The prince of Verona rules the city like a king and everyone obeys him. It is set over a period of four day. Shakespeare got the idea from a poem

What is the Significance and Function of Phonological Rules in Language?

1058 words - 4 pages What is the significance/function of phonological rules in language? Illustrate your answer with reference to three such rules (in English or any language you are familiar with), and give examples of how each rule operates. (968 words)INTRODUCTIONPhonological rules are a system of writing, using formal notation, which allows linguists to express how to pronounce speech phonetically. Phonological rules are part of every speaker's linguistic

The Dramatic Significance of Act four Scene One of William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing

1946 words - 8 pages The Dramatic Significance of Act four Scene One of William Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing Act 4 in the romantic comedy 'Much ado about nothing' is of great dramatic significance to the whole play, as it is in Scene 1 where Shakespeare brings out the different sides of the characters to illustrate the complexities of love and relationships. Act 4 Scene 1 is clustered with different incidents and in this essay, I will

Analysing the Dramatic Significance of Act 3 Scene 5 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

2698 words - 11 pages Analysing the Dramatic Significance of Act 3 Scene 5 of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet The timeless tragedy of William Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet is based upon two "star cross'd lovers", who are caught up in an ongoing feud between their two families. These are the houses of Capulet, where Juliet descends from, and the house of Montague, which Romeo belongs to. At the beginning of Act 3 Scene 5, Romeo and

J.B Priestley’s Use of Language, Character, and Setting for Dramatic Effect in An Inspector Calls

5319 words - 21 pages J.B Priestley’s Use of Language, Character, and Setting for Dramatic Effect in An Inspector Calls This essay shall examine the way in which J.B. Priestley creates dramatic effect in his 1945 play – ‘An Inspector Calls’. The play is centred on an Inspector who gatecrashes the Birling’s engagement party to their daughter Sheila and her Fiancé Gerald croft, by announcing that earlier in the day a girl called Eva Smith, also

The Significance of the Players in Hamlet

935 words - 4 pages The Significance of the Players in Hamlet      Most characters in Hamlet present themselves as something other than themselves or how as we, the audience, or another character thinks they should appear.  Two of the main characters in this play, Hamlet and King Claudius, are constantly acting as something other than their true nature.    Ironically, the characters that invoke changes in Hamlet and King Claudius to reveal their real

The Significance of the Blues in History

2204 words - 9 pages music. According to Douglas Henry Daniels in his “The significance of Blues for American History,” the blues are singular significance for understanding the American historical experience, which has the tragi-comic characteristics of music (Daniels 14). The blues are a truthful depiction of the spirit of the American experience. The blues will continue to inform future generations of how we as Americans have moved forward and how the blues

The Significance of the Handkerchief in Othello

1079 words - 4 pages How can one small piece of fabric manifest so much havoc? In William Shakespeare’s Othello, there is great significance of a powerful symbol that completely alters the fate of the story. “In the case of the handkerchief, it stands for several things, things that cannot be seen” (Hacht 663). This symbol, the handkerchief, is given to Desdemona by Othello, as a token of his love, and to their new beginnings as husband and wife. However, the

Significance of the Women in Sophocles' Antigone

2556 words - 10 pages Significance of the Women in Antigone                 Michael J. O’Brien in the Introduction to Twentieth Century Interpretations of Oedipus Rex, maintains that there is “a good deal of evidence to support this view” that the fifth century playwright was the “educator of his people” and a “teacher” (4). Sophocles in his tragedy Antigone teaches about “morally desirable attitudes and behavior,” (4) and uses a woman as heroine and another

The Significance of Shadrack in Morrison’s Sula

1297 words - 5 pages The people of the Bottom in Medallion, Ohio “knew Shadrack was crazy but that did not mean that he didn't have any sense or, even more important, that he had no power” (Morrison 15). In Toni Morrison’s novel Sula, Shadrack is a brief, but largely considerable character. His significance stems from the fact that he personifies one of Morrison’s main themes in the novel, which is the need for order, as well as that he serves as human embodiment of

Significance of the Women in Oedipus Rex

2769 words - 11 pages Significance of the Women in Oedipus Rex            Michael J. O’Brien in the Introduction to Twentieth Century Interpretations of Oedipus Rex, maintains that there is “a good deal of evidence to support this view” that the fifth century playwright was the “educator of his people” and a “teacher”. Sophocles in his tragedy, Oedipus Rex, teaches about “morally desirable attitudes and behavior,” (4) and uses three women to help convey these

Similar Essays

The Dramatic Significance In William Shakespeare's Hamlet

2935 words - 12 pages The Dramatic Significance in William Shakespeare's Hamlet Ans. Hamlet is the most complex but also the most entertaining of all Shakespeare's plays. It deals with the central character Hamlet a young man who is of an intellectual thoughtful and philosophical nature. The play is about how this young man is asked to do an action that is beyond him. The ghost of his beloved father appears to him and enjoins him the

The Significance/Function Of Phonological Rules In Language

1201 words - 5 pages The Significance/Function of Phonological Rules in LanguageIn a language it is often difficult to tell what the phonetic transcription of a sound will be, when not in isolation. That is, the pronunciation of a sound in a word or sentence is influenced by the sounds around it, and thus, may not be the same as our mental phonemic representation. We can determine the proper phonetic transcriptions/representations of these sounds by first applying

The Role Of Alfieri And His Dramatic Significance In The Play

1587 words - 6 pages Explore The Role Of Alfieri And Discuss His Dramatic Significance In The Play The play is set in Red Hook, in Brooklyn, in New York. It is set in the 1940's. Red Hook is a poor local community with many immigrants. Immigrants went to America because of the depression in Europe so people wanted work, and America was seen as a place of freedom and opportunity, otherwise known as 'The American Dream'. The play is mainly based on the

Discuss The Dramatic Role Or Significance Of The Witches In This Play

1160 words - 5 pages emphasis on the antithesis to the divinely ordained order of the universe and helps create dramatic emphasis. As evident from the play, special uses of clothing and weather helps determine the true character of the witches.Shakespeare has chosen to write this play where the topics explored within the play were very relevant to the time in which it was written. Practising witchcraft became an executable offence in 1604 so the witches in the play