The Importance Of Truth In A Doll’s House, By Henrik Ibsen

1253 words - 5 pages

Though unknown to the outside world, many seemingly perfect relationships are dark moral places to investigate. We constantly see idealistic relationships that appear flawless at first glance; however, we are too taken aback when we discover such relationships are based on deception. In A Doll House, Henrik Ibsen contends through Nora that truth plays a crucial role in idealistic living; and when idealistic lifestyles are built on deceit an individual will eventually undergo an epiphany resulting in a radical understanding of reality, potentially leading to the destruction of relationships. This idea is exercised in the play when Ibsen immerses us directly in the center of a romantic and idealized relationship between an older man, Torvald Helmer, and his childlike trophy wife Nora. While Nora is young, beautiful, childlike, immature and naïve, her husband Torvald is a stern, serious and controlling business man. Throughout the play, we discover how faulty and deceptive based the relationship between Torvald and Nora is, and so does Nora. Act one involves an introduction of the relationship between the two, and we are first introduced to the idea of how baseless the relationship really is on truth. The second act develops Nora’s recognition of the faulty marriage and further problems begin to complicate as well as develop Nora’s understanding; finally, the third act is when Nora experiences the epiphany that her relationship with Torvald is truly faulty and is based on nothing true at all. Although the idea that was significantly radical in Ibsen’s time, it is significant and seems to become more evident as a truth in our society today. Openness and truth is necessary for a truly idealistic lifestyle.
In Act I we are introduced to Nora and Torvald, including Torvald’s superior attitude over his naïve wife, and we begin to see nuances and lapses in the verity of the two’s marriage. Ibsen focuses on setting up the unveiling in the final acts, in that we are introduced to the idea that the truth coming to light is inevitable, and may soon have disastrous effects. Nora is depicted as being an extremely manipulative woman in order to get her way, she is quoted on numerous occasions saying things such as; “I’ll do anything to please you Torvald, I’ll sing for you, dance for you,” and she is portrayed as an uninformed and naïve young lady. The tricks Nora is willing to perform in order to satisfy her husband provide the foundation for the idea that the two are really living an idealistic lifestyle at all, and are really caught up in a web of lies and deception. Ibsen uses a variety of techniques to portray how disguised and fake the marriage is; such as the Christmas tree which is decorated and set up, and the significance given to the clothing of Nora and her Husband. In the case of the Christmas tree, its significance is that it represents exactly what their marriage is. It is covered with decorations, appearing ideal, but has no grounds in the...

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