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The Inception Of Communism In Japan

1017 words - 4 pages

The turn of the century for Japan came as a smooth transition from the enclosed cultural setup to the widespread adoption of the external influence of the other world. Up to the time of century turn, Japan had concentrated on having a clear control on the infiltration of the masses by new ideas and acts of handing over revenue and wealth creation to the control and eyes of the government. Sanshiro is the literature that points us to the exact scenario that existed in Japan at that time. The author introduces us to the prevalent conditions that incubated the gradual alteration of the traditional setup upheld for long by the Japanese. It is therefore to note that the existence of a varied strata of the population led to the initial revolution among the Japanese people.
Sanshiro represents the less modernized parts of the Japanese nation at the turn of the century. The author of Sanshiro also introduces us to a host of characters who represent various levels of people in the strata of society. This existence of layers led to the quick adoption and implementation of the communist manifesto. As it is the case with Sanshiro, so it with the Communist manifesto. In the manifesto Marx introduces us to two different vital groups of people he refers to as Bourgeois and the Proletarians. According to Marx these two groups exist so as to ensure a balance in life. He goes further to indicate the conflict existed at the time of the turn of the century. Marx identifies that the ploterians are a working class kind of people that have all the dependence on the people responsible for creating these jobs.
The turn of the century led to the widespread adoption of permanent structures as opposed to makeshift accommodation facilities. In Sanshiro we are introduced to the process of change in the environment prevalent before a major appraisal or revolution occurs. For instance, Sanshiro comes from a very well maintained traditional village. This phenomenon poses a challenge a great challenge to the process of adopting key societal milestone. A Proletarian’s standpoint includes the view of societal progress from under the guidance of the war to overthrow the bourgeois class of people.
Natsume indicates that the 23 years old Sanshiro, finds himself struggling to communicate with his peers and colleagues. This arises because of the limited exposure that Sanshiro has. Consider the case of his friends and fellow students who the author identifies as a mindset that is opportunity and urban site. Sanshiro finds it so weird to share a single room with an individual of the opposite gender. This happens on their way to Tokyo.
As seen in the year 1895, Tokyo grows into a big centre with a metropolitan texture of contributory tribes and classes. Tokyo is described as a city that is passive because of its metamorphosis from a city that takes care of the national interest to a city where all members are part of either employers or the servants. this transformation is a clear...

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