This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Rise Of The Nazi Party

1068 words - 4 pages

The Rise of the Nazi Party

Hitler’s rise to power was the result of many factors, but Hitler’s ability to take advantage of Germany’s poor leadership and economical and political conditions was the most significant factor. His ability to manipulate the media and the German public whilst taking advantage of Germany’s poor leadership resulted in both the collapse of the Weimar Republic and the rise of Hitler and the nazi party. During the early 1920s, Germany was struggling with economic instability and political uncertainty. Germany, after being defeated in the Great War, was forced to sign the unforgiving treaty of Versailles, which the Weimar Republic was held responsible for. This brought forward feelings of fear, anger and insecurity towards the Weimar Republic. Hitler built on these feelings and offered the secure and promising alternative of the extremist nazi party. Although there were many factors that contributed to the rise of Hitler and the collapse of the Weimar republic, Hitler’s ability to build upon people’s frustrated view of the hatred of the treaty of Versailles and the circumstances it placed upon the German nation, was the fundamental reason for Hitler’s rise to power and the Weimar Republic to collapse

The Treaty of Versailles, signed by the Weimar Republic at the conclusion of WW1, introduced economic insatiability and caused a profusion of hardship. The idea of resorting to an extremist group promising better alternatives became an attractive option to many Germans. The Treaty of Versailles’ vindictive terms and unreasonable reparations (6,600,000,000 pounds) resulted in undesired economic circumstances. Unemployment rose to 25%, no less than fifty percent of school children were undernourished and annual meat consumption fell from 52kg to 26kg per person. In general, the German standard of living decreased dramatically. The terms of the hated treaty angered and frustrated people. Hitler, intensely detesting the November criminals1, promised to build a back powerful nation, the German public, in a state of disillusionment, responded positively to this claim and began to support the Nazi Party. Hitler’s ability to take advantage of the Treaty of Versalles and the hardship that it brought to the German nation contributed to Hitler’s rise to power and the collapse of the Weimar Republic.

The instability of the newly formed Weimar Republic resulted in a weak government prone to problems, Hitler took advantage of this weakness and introduced a secure alternative. During the hardship of the 1920s and1930s, political incompetence was highlighted, the Weimar Government proved its incompetence time and time again. .The instability of the Weimar Republic was so great that the average life-span of Reich cabinets was from 6-7 months. Their incapability of providing justice to outbreaks of violence, such as political assassinations is one example of the incompetence of the Weimar Republic. When Germany found its self...

Find Another Essay On The Rise of the Nazi Party

The Success of the Nazi Party

1341 words - 5 pages The Success of the Nazi Party The Nazi Party's leadership encompassed many aspects. Not least of those was the use of fear and terror. Helping control the populace and ensuring they remained subdued was a key factor in Nazi success. However other factors were involved such as Hitler's economic policies and foreign policy. Hence, how important was the use of fear and terror to the Nazi Party's survival. Fear and

The Nazi Party Essay

2596 words - 10 pages The Nazi Party During the 1930s, the Nazi Regime attempted to construct what it believed to be a utopian society. The Nazis’ rise to power can be viewed as a modern revolution, in which their objective to create an ideal Nazi Volksgemeinschaft (community of people) was achieved by highly regulating all areas of German life. From the arts and literature to sexual activity and race relations, the Nazi Party implemented legislation that

The Nazi Party

2928 words - 12 pages The Nazi Party had a series of ideas which it incorporated into the regime. These ideas were all working together to help achieve Hitlerís plans of conquest. Though it is argued that a lot of these ideas were more of a hindrance, than a help. One of the principle ideas of a fascist state is total control. Hitler used this principle to make the task of achieving all his other goals much easier. "The Reichstag has passed the following law the

The 25 Points of Hitler's Nazi Party

1674 words - 7 pages The 25 Points of Hitler's Nazi Party We demand the union of all Germans in a Great Germany on the basis of the principle of self-determination of all peoples. We demand that the German people have rights equal to those of other nations; and that the Peace Treaties of Versailles and St. Germain shall be abrogated. We demand land and territory (colonies) for the maintenance of our people and the settlement of our

DESPERATION: The Rise of the Nazi State

1191 words - 5 pages , “Mein Kampf” (My struggle) in which it is hinted multiple times that the only solution to the Jewish problem would be genocide. While you might say that only people who read the book might have known what Hitler was all about, but during the time it was a popular read due to his rising fame as a politician and the head of the Nazi party. Hitler and his parties rise to power were not as swift and decisive as many people think it to have been

Hitler and the Nazi Party

1040 words - 4 pages Hitler and his Nazi party brought about various changes in Germany between 1934 and 1939. These are political, economical, and social changes, and they affected many people in different ways. The ordinary people in Germany, especially those who were unemployed were the ones who were benefited by some of the economical changes that the Nazis made. However, German communists, social democrats, Jews, and other people whom the Nazis took a

Factors Leading to the Support of the Nazi Party

1810 words - 7 pages 1930 (second largest party) and they were now in a much stronger position to challenge for power. The amount of people voting in Germany has also risen significantly, the Nazi vote had risen from 1.5 million in 1928 to 7.5 million in 1930. Bruning’s government survived until May 1932 but the continuing rise in unemployment allowed Schleicher to engineer Bruning’s downfall. Schleicher persuaded Hindenburg to

Fascism and the Nazi Party: How was Fascism the key ideology behind the success of the Nazi Party?

1458 words - 6 pages through the success and use of the Nazi party. Through Hitler's leadership he was able to keep a strong hold on Germany by the use of fascist ideology, his dictatorship, creating a one party state and moulding his master race.During Hitler's reign he used his strong fascist ideology to keep a tight hold on the German nation. Hitler looked up to Benito Mussolini for much of his political life, therefore it has been said that much of Hitler's fascist

An Examination into the Rise of Nazi Popularity

953 words - 4 pages highly unlikely. This meant that for their efforts to have any effect whatsoever, they would have to turn towards the rightwing mindset and asses all options therein. With the Nazi Party being the most prominent rightwing faction, its rise in support was completely inevitable. This explains how the German people's hatred of the Weimar Republic was a key factor of the Nazi party's rise of popularity.The Nazi political party was indeed fortunate to

Turkey: The Rise of Akp Party and the Islam

2787 words - 12 pages Turkey: The rise of Akp Party and the Islam. The last October the Turkey's prime minister Erdogan announced key political reforms which including lifting a ban on Islamic headscarves. The moves come as critics accuse Erdogan of Islamising the secular country. The headscarf controversy is the emblem of a long-standing rivalry in Turkish society between religious conservatives, who form the bulk of Erdogan's Islamic-rooted Justice and

Martin Bormann's role in the Nazi Party

1757 words - 7 pages Martin Bormann was a prominent Nazi who served as Private Secretary to Adolf Hitler and by the early 1940s had become head of the Parteikanzlerei (Party Chancellery). Despite his apparent lack of skill and imprisonment for murder in the 1920s, Bormann rose through the German ranks, eventually wielding a huge amount of power in administering Hitler's personal finances, paperwork, appointments and ultimately controlling all information. However

Similar Essays

Hitler's Role In The Rise Of The Nazi Party

6436 words - 26 pages Hitler's Role in the Rise of the Nazi Party Since the beginning of the 20th century a lot of people have made their mark on history but non-more so than Adolf Hitler. Historians see Hitler as being the demons of all dreams, his patriotism for Germany led him to do unbelievable tasks that saw nearly 6 million Jews being annihilated and a further more 15 million soldiers to died in battle. The crimes that he committed

Hitler And The Nazi Party: The Rise Of Hilter

734 words - 3 pages History has reveabed many dictators but none as famous as Adolf Hitler. In the short time that it took Hitler and Nazi party to rise to power the distershen it made for the old government slipt under the raidar. Once Hitler tuck power he made plans to make a new fighting force inside the army loyal only to him. In time the Nazi Party just turned into a tule for Hitler's plans. This plans brot the beeginning of the end for Hitler and the Nazi

Speer’s Rise In The Nazi Party

1375 words - 6 pages Speer’s Rise in the Nazi Party Albert Speer rose from a mere architect to be one of the most influential Nazi leaders of the Third Reich, and self-admittedly Hitler’s closest friend. As a young, struggling architect Speer joined the Nazi Party as a ‘Septemberling’, and subsequently began to design many of the displays and structures that succeeded in promoting the Fuhrer Myth. Within the NSDAP Speer progressed to

Weimar Republic The Weimar Republic Was An Overall Failure And Created The Right Social, Political And Economic Conditions For The Rise Of Extremist Groups Like The Nazi Party

1540 words - 7 pages failure and did create the right social, political and economic conditions for the rise of extremist parties like the Nazis. The basic lack of support for the Weimar republic among the German people, the unstable economy, the depression of 1929, the unresolved defeat of 1918 and the forced struggle against the activities of the Nazi like revolts and protests, and also the Nazis party overall presentations to the public, all contributed to the failure of the Weimar republic resulting in the rise of the Nazis