The Inefficiency Of The U.S. Constitution

1361 words - 5 pages

The Inefficiency of the Constitution

The United States' Constitution is one the most heralded documents in our nation's history. It is also the most copied Constitution in the world. Many nations have taken the ideals and values from our Constitution and instilled them in their own. It is amazing to think that after 200 years, it still holds relevance to our nation's politics and procedures. However, regardless of how important this document is to our government, the operation remains time consuming and ineffective. The U.S. Constitution established an inefficient system that encourages careful deliberation between government factions representing different and sometimes competing interests.
The Constitution of the United States set up an intricate government with a very brief document. The Constitution is actually shorter than this essay, but was still able to set up all of the procedures that make our government act so slowly today. One process that takes an especially long time is passing a bill to make a law. Every governmental action has to be put into writing and then passed by the Congress and the Supreme Court. Too many government agencies have to examine every bill. The United States government only starts at the national level with the Executive, Judicial, and Legislative branches. Everything breaks down into more areas such as the House of Representatives and the Senate. The Federal government's semi-equal is the state government. State government breaks down into several subsidiaries as well. The court system is an excellent example of how a government system breaks down from a national to a community level. For instance, the high court in America is the U.S. Supreme Court. The step down from there is the Court of Appeals or perhaps a State Supreme Court. There it breaks down into many different types and sections of courts from circuit courts to county courts.
There is no immediate crisis relief in the United States . After an event happens, our government deliberates for as long as they think they need to, discussing what should be done. Gen. George S. Patton speaks against laggard planning; "A good plan today is better than a perfect plan tomorrow." The U.S. government should take a word of advice from one of its most revered generals. Our government debates quite well, they also examine things very thoroughly, but these debates also slow the action down. The process in which the government makes decisions is laggard because of all the formalities and "red tape".
The Great Depression is an excellent example in history of how the government drags its feet on important issues. President Franklin D. Roosevelt was genuinely concerned for the well being of the nation. Finally, he and his advisors came up with "the New Deal", Roosevelt's plan to put America back on its economic feet. Try as he may, the U.S. Supreme Court would not pass the President's proposed bill. They ruled that the depression in...

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