The Influence Of Cosmological Thought Essay

1623 words - 6 pages

Cosmology is the universal observation of extra terrestrial cosmos that illustrate the meaning and origins of life. Cosmological thought defines the beliefs and practises in civilisations and is apparent in the reflection of social hierarchy and structure in many cultures. It can be described in anthropological thought as a cultural phenomenon that has been constructed by many ancient civilisations, depicted for thousands of years in ancient cave art, logography and hieroglyphics some of which have been dated to as far back as the upper Pleistocene epoch (Monroe and Wicander 2009:364) during which time prehistoric rock art has been discovered. Priests and higher powers use cosmological knowledge to clarify the meaning of life, also to define social structures and hierarchies in tribal, chiefdom, imperial and commercial societies in history. Cosmologies also define past, present and future as cyclical changes take place in the Earths annual rotation around the sun, which allow societies to predict environmental changes in the future. A nomadic society distant from technology can detect this by the changing of seasons and observations of spatial relation of stars in the night sky. The symbolic structure has been considered to relate to hypothesis about role structure (Douglas, 1970).Cosmologies define ideologies associated with the divine, the origins and nature and the evolution of the universe, it is common to attempt to use cosmological explanations to describe the world as a part of vast scope of the universe. The meanings and descriptions discovered often attribute to the activities and practises of citizens, and also definite social hierarchies and structure within all forms of society. The way Cosmologies are deciphered by each individual society’s viewpoint changes with the ongoing factors of environment, and social hierarchies.

The importance of cosmologies in civilizations is apparent because of its functional application to social structure and myths of creation that create a deeper meaning in society. Creation myths are central to cosmological thought in all scales of society, which endeavour to incorporate historical deities as the creators of the sun, earth, biosphere and hydrosphere known who had a god like and religious qualities due to the way they were idolised and worshipped in imperial society. The cosmologies constructed in Mexicans Yucatan peninsula ancient Mesopotamian societies believed in a higher celestial realm, comparable to that of Hawaiian imperial cosmologies and creation myths whom, like Mesopotamian societies connect all apparent aspects of the world; the sun, the moon and the Earth. Mesopotamian societies central cosmological thought was spatial order and reciprocity (Levine, 2007:364-6), the belief that the Earth was divided into four quarters, conceptualized by the Southern Cross. Mayan cities were constructed in adherence to this spatial philosophy, and modern rural Andean villages still adhere with this...

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