The Inner Self In The Awakening, Wuthering Heights, And Fences

2065 words - 8 pages

The Inner Self in The Awakening, Wuthering Heights, and Fences

 
     Does turmoil in people promote chaos in the world, or does chaos in the world create turmoil in people? To uncover a single answer to such a question is impossible. Therefore, those who seek a solution find themselves at a stalemate, and the query posed becomes rhetorical. Nevertheless, it initiates another inquiry worth thought and reflection: since the chaotic world is already well established, whether or not a product of human havoc, how is one to escape it and live uninhibitedly? Fences, by August Wilson, The Awakening, by Kate Chopin, and Wuthering Heights, by Emily Brontë embody people who struggle against the chaos in the world to be rid of personal turmoil. The characters in the novel took different approaches to find and free their innermost selves in the midst of societal disorder, and the ultimate resolution depended on each person's nature, strength, permissiveness, and courage. Troy Maxson in Fences employed blame and denial, The Awakening's Edna Pontellier, rebellion and acceptance, and Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw of Wuthering Heights applied passion, as tools to search for individual peace in an otherwise cluttered survival.

 

Mid-1990s arranged Fences author, August Wilson, the ideal prospect to relate the account of an African-American man living during, and in the aftermath of, the African-American oppression. Troy Maxson, a classic character, fills and dominates the compact environment of a 1957-1965 northern industrial inner city in Pennsylvania, United States. Living only a few years before and after the Civil Rights Act of 1964, ---the act that helped grant African Americans legal enfranchisement politically, economically, and above all, socially---the mayhem of his time and situation in life unquestionably shaped Maxson's moral fiber. With the culture bedlam dictating and often hindering his every progress, Maxson found consolation in placing the liability on the nation's social order, thus escaping the blame for his life's futility, leaving him with the soothing belief that his identity and own motivation (or lack thereof) had nothing to do with the emptiness that was his life. When Maxson's wife, Rose, attempted make him admit that the reason he was not playing in the major league was because he was too old, Maxson replied, "What do you mean too old? Don't come telling me I was too old. I just wasn't the right color. Hell, I'm fifty-three years old and can do better than Selkirk's .269 right now! (Wilson 218)" Troy Maxson persistently and constantly refuted the notion that his being himself---not as a black man or even as an old man, but as Troy Maxson, fifty-three years old---had anything to do with his life wanting for anything; he persistently and constantly blamed the rest of human existence for his providence, any human but himself. The denial of personal duty and his defiance against the...

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