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The Involvement Of War In British Literature

1217 words - 5 pages

Kimberley Johnson creates an article about the angel, Raphael, which was to send a message to Adam and Eve, warning about the temptation of Satan during the war between God and Satan. Raphael failed to have the human race receive the message for Raphael stopped one of Satan’s demons and the war between God and Satan continues which is refers to the War of Heaven. Johnson implies that, “The sweeping war epic Raphael tells in Book 6 stands in direct opposition to Michael’s counsel not to imagine the battle between good and evil as a duel, and it also contradicts the narrative priorities that Milton himself lays out at the beginning of Book 9” (Johnson 213). This passage in Johnson’s article explains that Milton intentions of creating the epic poem were the war between good and evil, God and Satan. “Which returns us to Empson’s complaint about Raphael’s responsibility for the Fall. Beyond his description of the hierarchies that digestion may advantage, the archangel’s account of the War in Heaven both fails to prepare Adam and Eve for the misrepresentations and subtle persuasions that stock Satan’s treacherous arsenal, and promotes a system of classification in which difference indicates hierarchy and the relative value of two items is determined by relative displays of power.” (Johnson 215).
Johnson illustrates Raphael failure of warning Adam and Eve, and made them unprepared for Satan to release his treachery by using the temptation of power. Raphael is fully responsibility of the Fall of mankind. Johnson continues by stating, “Raphael’s dramatic, even spectacular, rendering of the War in Heaven, which comprises nearly the entirety of Book 6, has provoked, for good or ill, a line of readers stretching back to Sir Isaac Newton” (Johnson 206). The dramatic scenes during times of war in Paradise Lost are a writer’s trade mark in British literature. In Elizabeth Roberts- Pedersen’s article of the affects the brain from war in British Medical Literature.
Roberts- Pedersen studies the psychiatric understandings of the 'war neurosis' suffered by British servicemen during that conflict were predicated on a notion of the 'neurotic serviceman' as an objective personality type predisposed to break down during the strain of wartime. Roberts- Pederson disclaims that, “discounting the effects of traumatic war experiences in favor of an aetiology that located the genesis of psychiatric disorder within the inherently unstable individual, such an approach minimized the influence of the martial environment in favor of heredity and the events of early childhood as the ultimate arbiters of mental stability in service personnel.”(Robert-Pederson 408). The experience of a serviceman after a war seems to cause instability and the only chance of stability is perhaps recalling to past childhood events. Robert-Pederson then adds, “The remarkable facility with which the term came to encapsulate popular understandings of the “madness” of industrialized...

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