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The Iraq War Essay

1252 words - 5 pages

Although severe consequences come with the decision of war with Iraq, most blinded United States of America citizens are still yet persuaded to support such a war. The Bush Administration has covered their schemes of war with lies to gain support. While weapons of mass destruction is supposedly the reason why the United States launched military action to begin with, all the clearly ignored consequences will haunt their final decision of war, and will remind them how the war is not and never was justified. Whither the war is for the protection of the United States and their alliances, or for oil production and the spread of democracy, the United States is only intensifying the aggression of the situation.
The Bush Administration’s plan for war in Iraq, violates International laws, furthermore being ethically wrong (Walton). Despite of all the warnings of war, President George W. Bush still tries to convince the United States that war is somehow justified, with his persuasive lies. Although they struggle to justify such an action towards Iraq, war is no and never will be justified. Punishment for such a decision will be the result of loss of allies and the appalling violation of the United States’ historical principle, “never make such an action towards a country that has not harmed America nor America’s depended on allies” (Dudley 28). The consequences, by far out-weigh the positive affects of war.

Initially, September 11th seemed to be the turning point of the United States, although there is no reasonable explanation for such an action (Zinn). But still, particular event had such a dramatic change of the United States’ opinion towards Iraq. Despite of all the evidence that obviously proves Iraq is innocent, the United States still opposes Iraq after that day. The United States’ citizens only patriotically follows George W. Bush, unaware of the extending consequences and the simple reason of war. Bush blinds the United Sates of reality, while pointing his finger towards Iraq in blame.
“Previously the United States has always been sociable with brutal dictators such as Saddam Hussein, as long as it was a financial advantage to America” (Zinn). Now that Saddam seems to be the only dictator afoot, the United States ironically takes action (Zinn). However Saddam was blamed for Sept. 11th, despite of all the evidence that clearly revealed that Saddam had nothing to do with the terrorists attack of that day. Nevertheless, if Saddam would have been connected to the assault of 9/11, still yet, the United States has no justification for war with Iraq, for the fault of one dictator. Hopefully the Bush Administration would not consider using the fear of the remembered day of 2001 to gain the necessary support of war (Walton).
On the other hand, the Bush Administration claims the whole aim of the operation in Iraq was not to only disarm Iraq, but to stop the dangerous spread of weapons of mass destruction through the military force (Schell)....

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