The Irony In "The Lottery" Essay

514 words - 2 pages

The Irony in 'The Lottery'Shirley Jackson wrote the story 'The Lottery.' A lottery is typically thought of assomething good because it usually involves winning something such as money or prizes. Inthis lottery it is not what they win but it is what is lost. Point of views, situations, and thetitle are all ironic to the story 'The Lottery.'The point of view in 'The Lottery' is ironic to the outcome. Jackson used thirdperson dramatic point of view when writing 'The Lottery.' The third person dramaticpoint of view allowed the author to keep the outcome of the story a surprise. Theoutcome is ironic because the readers are led to believe everything is fine because we donot really know what anyone is thinking. This point of view enables the ending to beironic.The situations in 'The Lottery' are ironic. The author's use of words keeps thereader thinking that there is nothing wrong and that everyone is fine. The story starts bydescribing the day as 'clear and sunny'(309). The people of the town are happy and goingon as if it is every other day. The situation where Mrs. Hutchinson is jokingly saying toMrs. Delacroix 'Clean forgot what day it was'(311) is ironic because something that is soawful cannot truly be forgotten. At the end of the story when Mrs. Hutchinson is chosenfor the lottery, it is ironic that it does not upset her that she was chosen. She is upsetbecause of the way she is chosen. She shows this by saying 'It isn't fair, it isn't right' (316).The...

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