This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Jacksonian Period Of Common Man.

899 words - 4 pages

The Age of Jackson must have been an exciting time. There were electoral scandals, Indian removals, bank vetoes, and nullification. Jackson was the first president from the west, the first to be nominated at a formal political convention, and the first to hold office without a college education. Jackson owned slaves, many acres, and a mansion; he was a frontier aristocrat. He was a fierce military man who had headed the campaign to acquire Florida, and he was seen as a national hero. The Age of Common Man included equality in economic, politic, and reform movements benefited the common people.When Jackson came to power, the nation had been drastically changed by the Industrial Revolution. The simple, pastoral, agricultural lifestyle was being replaced by the manufacturing world, of cities and factories. On the other hand national bank became a major problem in nation's economy .Nicholas Biddle proved great opposition to President Jackson. He wanted to re-charter the National Bank; however, many people were against Biddle's decision. This was particularly true of people in the west. They were still wary of a national bank, after the Panic of 1819, which involved mishaps in land speculation. Jackson shared the predominately western opinion that several small banks would be a better service to the nation than one, large bank would. A major problem with a national bank would lie in its willingness only to make loans to the wealthy. This would be of no use to the middleclass. Jackson would not allow Biddle to gain any more power than he already had.Politically, the nation was in great turmoil. There was still an everlasting debate among men in power, over what should prevail. The right to vote was still a major issue, the middle class feeling robbed of power in governmental decisions, the upper class feeling threatened by the growth of the middleclass. However, Jackson brought with him many new ideas and principles. Since he himself had very modest roots, he sympathized with the middle and lower classes. He had worked for everything he had of value in life, and he acknowledged the importance of being able to climb the social ladder based upon one's own merit. Jackson felt that if a man was willing to work hard, he should be able to get what he wanted out of life. Jackson, uneducated as he was, was a very shrewd man. Using the spoils system, he all but totally replaced the cabinet from the previous administration. By rewarding the men who had helped him reach his current state, he made it clear that the middleclass could improve their condition. The cabinet was no longer filled with wealthy men of status, but...

Find Another Essay On The Jacksonian Period of common man.

The Nobility of Labor and the Common Man

625 words - 3 pages The Nobility of Labor and the Common Man The whaling industry in the 1800’s went largely unnoticed by people of high social standing. Businessmen, attornies, and other professionals frowned upon whaling. Many viewed whalers as nothing more than common butchers killing to make a living. Society looked down on people who would dirty their hands, or lower themselves to such common labor. Melville’s portrayal of

Socialism for the Common Man Essay

2429 words - 10 pages order to show the Chicago meatpacking industry’s inhumane treatment of the common man during the 1920s. Despite how the public actually responded, The Jungle was meant to open the public’s eyes to the industries’ wage enslavement of its workers while promoting Socialism as the answer to Capitalistic monopolies. First and foremost, Sinclair promotes the cause of socialism by describing the gruesome conditions that are provided for the workers at the

This is on the period of jacksonian democracy and how they saw themselves as the guardians of the United States Constitution, political democracy, and individual liberty

710 words - 3 pages , which boosted commerce and helped the common man. The Jacksonian democrats portrayed themselves as saviors of the common people, but this is a controversial subject. They were unusually wealthy, supported equality between white men only, enacted devastating economic policies, and disregarded the capability of the federal government. The Jacksonians saw themselves as guardians but as for the people, only a select few may have seen that.During the

The Democratic Spirit Of The Jacksonian Age

933 words - 4 pages The Democratic Spirit of The Jacksonian Age America was becoming more democratic during the Age of Jackson through reforms in Religion- Philosophy such as the introduction of "democratic" religions and viewpoints, social changes which gave people more of the rights they deserved, and political reforms which got more people involved in politics and more specifically voting. One of the reforms occurring during this age was a

The Common Factors that Led to the Establishment of Totalitarian Regimes in Italy and Germany in the Inter-War Period

1358 words - 5 pages The Common Factors that Led to the Establishment of Totalitarian Regimes in Italy and Germany in the Inter-War Period Totalitarian regimes refer to the type of government in which the State has total control over all aspects of people's life. Main features include an infallible leader, planned economy, strict party discipline, strong armament, an official doctrine that everyone has to believe, and absolute obedience of

The Tragedy of the Common Man in Death of a Salesman

1948 words - 8 pages contradictions (rather than merely elaborating the reasons) underlying the United States’ apparent success. The continuous struggle and tragic death of Willy Loman represents the tragedy of the common man in America. However, the play illustrates that success should not be based on what others think or who one knows, but it should be based on what our founding fathers based it on: hard-work, support, success, and freedom of choice. Works Cited

How Did the Period of Renaissance Alter Man’s View of Man?

1248 words - 5 pages The Renaissance period was a truly enlightening period in history that birthed many great advancements in all fields of science, and inventions. How did the period of time we know as, “The Renaissance”, change or alter man’s view of man? Well, we know that in the Middle Ages, the Church had authority over most people, and people had very few rights. In 1400’s, the Middle Ages had ended and then began the Renaissance. The Renaissance was a

The Plight of the Common Man in Herman Melville's Bartleby, the Scrivener

4414 words - 18 pages George Edward Woodberry, author of the Heart of Man, published in 1899, emphasized the significance of the role of the individual as an active and equal partner in American democratic rule: The doctrine of the equality of mankind by virtue of their birth as men, with its consequent right to equality of opportunity for self-development as a part of social justice, establishes a common basis of conviction, in respect to man, and a definite end as

"The Old Man and the Sea" by Hemingway. Goes through common themes and symbolism of story

565 words - 2 pages Many themes are present in Hemmingway's novel, The Old Man and the Sea. Hemingway uses wonderful imagery and symbolism to illustrate the struggles of the old man and the fish throughout the story. "Everything about him was old except his eyes and they were the same color as the sea and were cheerful and undefeated." "'But man is not made for defeat,' he said. 'A man can be destroyed but not defeated.'" In each of these quotes Hemingway is saying

The Common Man in a Millerian Tragedy: A Study of Miller’s Conventions in a Millerian Tragedy

822 words - 4 pages “I believe that the common man is as apt a subject for tragedy in its highest sense as kings were” ( Tragedy and the Common Man). Arthur Miller follows his Millerian conventions of tragedy in the writing of The Crucible. Often literature uses tragedy to display a depressing theme represented by the tragic hero. Miller uses the conventions of self-recognition and the common man to complete his tragedy in The Crucible. Miller defines recognition

Leonardo da Vinci: The Renaissance Man (Why Leonardo is the greatest artist of the Renaissance time period.)

939 words - 4 pages Leonardo da Vinci is indeed the most outstanding figure of the Renaissance period. He made many contributions through his many talents. He was a sculptor, architect, painter, engineer, musician, scientist, and inventor ("Web Museum" 1). This is why he earned himself the nickname as "The Renaissance Man" (Harden 1).Leonardo was born in 1452 in a small town called Anchiano. Anchiano was very close to another town called Vinci, hence his name. In

Similar Essays

The Social Changes Of Jacksonian Period And Ww1

1603 words - 6 pages Both the Jacksonian Period and post-World War I period encountered social changes, yet the post- World War I era was greater and more profound. While Jacksonian Democracy tried helped the common man, they neglected more than half of the population. Jacksonian Democrats reformed only to show their tendencies towards traditional white supremacy. As a result of the holes Jacksonian Democrats left behind, a series of social reforms arose. Some

Andrew Jackson And The Jacksonian Period

1136 words - 5 pages Andrew Jackson is the most significant political figure in American history, for under Jackson modern American government took shape. In the Jacksonian era, the white middle class took power and has never relinquished it. Because of this, the Jacksonian era has been described as the ?Age of the Common Man?. According to this view, a democratic, egalitarian culture emerged. This cultural emergence had a dramatic and wide ranging impact on

The Failure Of Jacksonian Democrats Essay

1612 words - 7 pages claimed to have held the interest of the common people in high regard, altering not only our Forefathers’ electoral processes but the government as a whole. However, through their actions toward their common people, the uprooting of Native Americans, and the fatality of a national bank, they eventually created a larger mess than just a “kitchen cabinet” could withstand. Although Jacksonian democrats held suspicion against the federal government’s

Jacksonian Democrats, Dbq, Explains The Positives Of The Jacksonian Influence

1109 words - 4 pages Supporters of President Jackson, Jacksonian Democrats, saw themselves as protectors of the United States Constitution, political democracy, individual liberty, and equality within economic opportunity. The ideas possessed by the Jackson supporters was nothing short of true.The Jacksonians were firmly entrenched behind the "humblest citizens". They believed in making the country better for the common man. With this, Jackson set out to get all of