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The Jewel Of Muslim Art Essay

1083 words - 5 pages

Many don’t know or remember the name of this building but everyone is familiar with it when they lay their eyes upon it. The Taj Mahal is an icon that is recognized globally in society. It is even recognized by children though they associate it with the palace based off the Taj Mahal in the popular Disney movie ‘Aladdin’. Though many people are acquainted with the image of the Taj Mahal, not many people, I feel, know much about the history or the details of the gargantuan palace.
Today, you don’t see too many palaces being built. You have residential buildings to live in, businesses used to create or distribute goods and services, and places of religion to worship inside of. In the 17th ...view middle of the document...

Jahan left a legacy of architecture and was known as one of the greatest patrons of Islamic architecture. His greatest structure: the Taj Mahal
In 1607, Shah Jahan was placed into an arranged marriage with Arjumand Banu Begum. He actually fell in love with her at first sight. They were both around 14 years old. The girl was part of a Persian noble. They did not get married for another five years in 1612 because of family feuds. During this time, he had to marry two other women, Akbarabadi Mahal and Kandahari Mahal only for important political reasons. It was known that the relationships of Shah Jahan with these two wives were not out of love. Shah Jahan loved Arjumand Banu Begum so much that he called her Mumtaz Mahal aka Jewel of the Palace. They had 14 children together of which seven survived to live as adults. Though there was genuine love between the two, Arjumand Banu. Eventually Mumtaz Mahal served as a consultant for her husband in. She advised him on many things pertaining to the state and was responsible for looking over official documents before they were finally submitted.
Mumtaz Mahal died at the age of 40 in 1631 while giving birth to her and Jahan’s daughter, Gauhara Begum. The cause of death is believed to be because postpartum hemorrhage most likely due to the length of time the delivery of their daughter took. After she died, Shah Jahan was devastated and filled with grief. His love for her so still so strong after death that he decided that he need to honor her in some way. She was temporarily buried in a garden called Zainbad. Her death had completely changed Shah Jahan's personality and lead to building of the Taj Mahal, where she was reburied.
Jahan wanted to get this right. He summoned architects from all over the world. They carefully drew a structure for the palace. The building was made from white marble
The building took twenty years to complete and was constructed from white marble...

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