The Johannine Notion Of Belief Essay

612 words - 2 pages

While the word “believe” may seem like a particularly broad and specific term, the context of John’s Gospel shows that it truly has various meanings. Granted, the word “believes” still holds the common definition of “accepting as true; to suppose; to have faith”, but in the Gospel of John, it takes on a much deeper meaning due to its context. In all uses of the word “believing”, the stories use a close relation with human senses (Just). Despite the countless goal of reaching complete blind-faith, the people Jesus addresses all need something tangible, and understandable in order to put God into perspective. Whether that perspective connects their understanding with past religious encounters, miraculous acts, or a loving comparison, the disciples have a terribly difficult time believing solely off of words.
“Believe” has been used in the same way as “accepted” (John 12:38). To accept Jesus’ message as valid, a person would be acknowledging its legitimacy and listening to it as a reliable source. By Jesus presenting his message in this way, it helps the people to relate their belief with something of concrete existence rather than that of an unknown origin. The belief is based off of “personal of impersonal objects” (Just).
In another example of John’s Gospel, Jesus attempts to ensure belief in the people by relating and drawing the strong connection between himself and God (John 12:44). Jesus is seen trying to convince the doubters for their sake of being saved. While they struggle with acceptance towards Jesus, he is stating that he truly was sent from God. The author of John portrays Jesus in a very difficult situation filled with rejection and a fight to convince people that he is here to save them. In this context, to believe in...

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