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The Jungle Analysis Paper

642 words - 3 pages

The Jungle Analysis Paper
     America, by the turn of the twentieth century, was regarded as the “Land of Opportunity,” and lured thousands of immigrants. The foreigners that fled to the United States were in search of new lives; better lives. America was at the age of industrialization, and the economy was shifting from agriculture to factories. There were jobs in the factories available to un-skilled workers, which were the majority of the immigrants. And industrialists had no problem finding a way to exploit the workers lives.
     The migration of Americans from farms to cities and the massive amount of immigration provided an abundant supply of cheap labor. Industrialists saw no economic sense in a hazardless workplace; an injured worker was easily replaced by another. Wages were kept low because there was always another worker willing to work for lower wages. The hiring of women and children as well as men created an excess     supply of labor; leaving every worker commanding low wages.
     Inadequate wages for workers forced all members of the family to work in the factories. Children as young as eight years old worked. Wages were paid hourly and there were few limits as to how many hours workers were allowed to work. A family’s income was still low considering the amount of hours they worked. As a result, multiple families shared small apartments and living conditions were dismal. Most families rented their housing.
     With the surplus of workers, factory owners were discouraged to maintain a clean and safe workplace. They were overly concerned with making profit; far more than the health of their workers. The cheaper the labor cost and the cost of sustaining a clean atmosphere; the more profit the owners would get. This led to a filthy and perilous working environment. The meat packing industry may have been the worst. It had high productivity, but its condition declined to the point of being hazardous to both the workers and...

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