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The Loss Of Individuality In The Strive For Power: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

1620 words - 6 pages

The love of Power and its grasp on humanity is exemplified in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. In Huxley’s dystopian society, access to power is limited; it is allowed only to those who have been conditioned to gain it. "We also predestine and condition. We decant our babies as socialized human beings, as Alphas or Epsilons, as future sewage workers or […] future Directors of Hatcheries." Power in Brave New World initiates from eliminating choice but also from giving the illusion of choice, thus, erasing any conception of choice. In other words, it allows people to miss the freedom they don't have; in this case, such control is exerted through pre-conditioning. The struggle for power in Brave New World clarifies how one can forget their principles while losing any sense of individualism they may have once had. With the reaffirmation and the deconstruction of gender roles in Brave New World, Huxley explains how the temptation of power can manipulate one to discard all semblance of individuality. This is done through the characters of Bernard Marx, Mustapha Mond, and John the Savage. The desire for power has the ability to corrupt the mind and cause one’s moral ground to crumble. It strips one of their ethics and individuality because in the pursuit of power they lose themselves.
In Brave New World, people are not born, instead, they are created through Bokanovsky's Process, "a series of arrests of development" by which millions of eggs bud and form a nearly endless supply of human embryos (Huxley 6). Before a person is even contrived, workers at the Conditioning Centre determine his appearance, his level and function in society, and even his intelligence. Incidentally, bokanovskification is "one of the major instruments of social stability" (Huxley 7). With the very creation of humans reduced to the mere semblance of a production assembly line, there can be no individuality; people are not even given the choice of what they want to be. The caste system provides a stable foundation for this new society. Instead of creating a struggle between the lower and upper classes, the lower castes Epsilons, Deltas and Gammas are conditioned to be so unintelligent as to be content with where they are and what they do. On the other hand, the upper castes Betas and Alphas are intelligent enough to be able to understand, and, in theory, overthrow the whole system. Hypnopaedia provides them moral and social education, a basis of concepts that are repeatedly pounded into their heads through sleep hypnosis: “Till at last the child's mind is these suggestions, and the sum of the suggestions is the child's mind. And not the child's mind only. The adult's mind too-all his life long. The mind that judges and desires and decides-made up of these suggestions. But all these suggestions are our suggestions!...The greatest moralizing and socializing force of all time.” (Huxley 28) Instead of possessing their own beliefs, people are forced to conform to the universal rules of...

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