This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Lacuna By Barbara Kingsolver Essay

1570 words - 6 pages

Covered in sweat and desperation, the boy pulled back his aching arms and casted the reel, again. Under the huffing of his breath, one could hear his hushed swears. Glazed over eyes and blistered hands, made up what was left of him. His mind boggled at what could happen if he failed once more. His parched throat leads him to remembering his jug of water in the corner of the dinghy. Perhaps he could reach over and grab the water; however, he had his eyes set on the bait and just as he nearly glanced away, the bait jerked under the water. His eyes engulfed in tears as he reeled in his prize, a 6 pound ilish fish. Now he could drink his water in triumph and pride, one day further from famine. Many individuals struggle with reeling in fish to save themselves from hunger, but if they are determined to catch what they desire most, almost nothing can get in their way, even if their conditions are harder than others, like when the boy that was fishing had to conquer hunger or in The Lacuna. Accordingly, perseverance is essential in many situations, whether these situations seem easy to overcome, or not. Likewise, the best theme of The Lacuna is: it is imperative to use persistence in order to achieve one’s goals, due to the struggles Harrison Shepard has to overcome in order to surpass his obstacles, similar to the fishing boy.
In order to identify the best theme in any form of literature, one must first figure out what a theme is and how to identify a theme. Themes are the moral of the story, or other forms of literature. After a book is read to a child, many times adults will say “What is the story trying to teach you” or “the moral of this story is…” this is not different from being asked what the theme is of a certain piece of literature. As children, people had to think through the story and what the storyline was consisted of, in particular, they had to think ‘What did the story try to emphasize?’ For example, in Romeo and Juliet, one of the main themes: love is a powerful force, can be considered as a result of the love between Romeo and Juliet. Without their passion, they would have never met their end or experienced the chaos in their lives, and the author, William Shakespeare, would have had no reason to have written it. Love was the justification of Romeo and Juliet’s actions. The author wanted the reader to understand that love is a powerful force; hence, the justification of why he initially wrote the novel. Although this was his main theme, many others were present; such as: the individual versus their society, faith is inevitable, and friends vs. foes. This is primarily due to what a theme is, the reason the reader believes that the author wrote the literature. Therefore, there can be many different themes based on what the reader interprets as the message. This is evident in all forms of literature whether a poem, children’s story, or a novel, similar to The Lacuna.
To identify a theme it is imperative to know what the piece of...

Find Another Essay On The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver

"The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver; "An Instant Bond"; Reflection upon relationships within the book

506 words - 2 pages hometowns in Kentucky were separated by only two counties, and that we had both been to the exact same Bob Segar concert ad the Kentucky State fair my senior year" (96 Kingsolver). They were so close, and so similar, this was not a big surprise. Lou Ann even points out a physical similarity. "It's been so long...You talk just like me" (102 Kingsolver). They had the same habits of run-on sentences and southern colloquial English. They could speak to each

Use of language and linguistics in The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver

940 words - 4 pages While reading The Poisonwood Bible, I was fascinated by Kingsolver's extensive use of Lingala, the language used in the region of the Congo where the Price family lives. Lingala is a language in which each word has several meanings, and Kingsolver has the characters in the story use language to reflect themselves. Kingsolver also masterfully wields words to connote subtle ideas throughout the novel.Throughout the novel are sprinkled many phrases

Themes of "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver: Family, Society unjustices, and people maturing

864 words - 3 pages Themes are the fundamental and universal ideas explored in a literary work. Throughout the novel "The Bean Trees" the author Barbara Kingsolver used several themes to get her points across. The opening theme in this novel is the framework of a true family. Another theme that is prevalent in the course of the novel is how society unrightfully judges and takes advantage of weaker people. The concluding theme in the novel is how characters progress

Stone Soup an Essay Written by Barbara Kingsolver

2081 words - 8 pages draws a tangent to the toy’s intended message. In her essay “Stone Soup”, Barbara Kingsolver focuses on this concept of “Familiy-of-Dolls Family Values” (“Stone Soup” 275) and how it contrasts with her own family; she sheds light on society’s association of negative connotations with families not of the norm. As Kingsolver comes to learn, the act of trying to justify to the exclusively ‘stereotypical family’ supporters that there exist special

The Poisonwood Bible and the Life of Barbara Kingsolver

1468 words - 6 pages bleed.” Writers often will use their own life experiences to re-experience important parts of their lives and translate it into a story to share with the world. Barbara Kingsolver expresses her ideas on sexism, cultural imperialism, and religion by creating the fictional story of the Poisonwood Bible using her own life experiences as content for the story. Childhood events can massively affect the direction and outcome of one’s life. Childhood is

The Poisonwood Bible, by Barbara Kingsolver

1190 words - 5 pages and belief, Leah was compassionate and genuine about her father's faith and his outlook on life. For this reason, she and her other sisters were slaves to his doctrine. They believed that his words were always true and his idea of saving the Congolese people would be a success. However, as time passed by Leah is confronted with racism, injustice and other issues that caused her to question the Christian faith. As these issues arise, Leah began

Change of Perspective from City Life to Country Life based on American Earth by Barbara Kingsolver

734 words - 3 pages and bustle involved in such a life can cause. Our instinctual desire for open expanses of wild land still remains, and with the building stress that has come to define society the need for the settling presence of nature has never been higher. Barbara Kingsolver explains and demonstrates her concern for this in an excerpt of her writing found in “American Earth.” The most important thought that I feel that she expressed was the fact that too many

Theme Analysis of The Poisonwood Bible by Barbra Kingsolver

1067 words - 5 pages In the book The Poisonwood Bible by Barbra Kingsolver, she uses motifs and themes such as issues over the western control, religion, and the death and force of nature. In literature authors use themes as a message to create points that will help make the big picture complete. Kingsolver is using multiple themes to connect what she is portraying from her writing to the reader. These themes come in different variations, but help us understand the

The Faithful Wife by Barbara L. Greenberg

715 words - 3 pages The Faithful Wife by Barbara L. Greenberg      “The Faithful Wife”, written by Barbara L. Greenberg, uses first-person narration to depict the style, language, and theme of the poem. By using first-person narration, Barbara Greenberg was able to portray events and ideas very persuasively to the reader. In addition, this first-person narrator creates dramatic irony concerning the title in reference to the body of the poem.      The reader

Money Today; A comparative essay between "Paper" by Catherine Lim and "The Winner" by Barbara Kimenye

614 words - 2 pages Money today seems to be the most important thing in people's lives, examples of this are shown in "Paper" by Catherine Lim; which tells the story of Tay Soon and his wife, and their general obsession with owning their own dream house. Another story that helps to prove this point is "The Winner" by Barbara Kimenye which center's itself around an elderly gentleman named Pius who is forced to deal with the acquisition of a large sum of money. While

The Importance of the Cell Phone Age: From Stone Age to Phone Age by Barbara Ehrenreich

865 words - 3 pages In “From Stone Age to Phone Age”, Barbara Ehrenreich describes that cell phones are not well suited to her even though they are fashionable. In her article, she points out cell phones are not used to connect people to each other but to isolate them from a big group of people. I think cell phones are very important to our daily life because they are convenient to manage our lives. Moreover, from the earlier cell phone age to nowadays, cell phones

Similar Essays

The Poisonwood Bible By Barbara Kingsolver

1786 words - 7 pages belief that language is a valuable tool, used by everyone- and in so many varying ways. Kingsolver effectively explores the breakdown of language in the event of pain (the village women squalling at their children’s death), and the importance of language to understanding deeper issues (Nathan’s confusion with bangala). The Poisonwood Bible teaches readers to become aware of not only other cultures in general, but especially their language, their

Transformations In "The Bean Trees" By Barbara Kingsolver

1474 words - 6 pages When thinking of birds, visualizing them building their nests in cacti certainly isn't the first thing that comes to mind. In the book, The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver, metaphorically everyone is constantly building their nests in cacti, and evolving from their experiences. From living in attics to taking trips across the country with no destination, characters in this book don't live what society considers the “conventional American

"Pigs In Heaven" By Barbara Kingsolver

838 words - 3 pages she thinks the theme is for her novel, Pigs in Heaven. Many critics approve of what she says and writes and others do not. Of these many critics, three critics gave more noticeable reviews for the novel. Rhoda Koenig, Karen Karbo, and Laura Shapiro, all gave Pigs in Heaven by Barbara Kingsolver, positive and negative reviews.First, Rhoda Koenig offers a negative assessment of Pigs in Heaven, faulting the novel's political implications and reliance

High Tide In Tucson By Barbara Kingsolver

741 words - 3 pages Writing Review - High Tide In TucsonIn High Tide In Tucson, Barbara Kingsolver touches on many aspects of living and the nuances that make life worth living. Her series of essays depict many situations found in life with a new light of clarity. In her essays, she is able to draw from her experiences to teach others the many life lessons that she has learned. Since all the essays involve narratives in her eyes, the reader is able to grasp the