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The Women's Rights Essay

1606 words - 6 pages

Have you ever wondered why women have the rights that they have today and not have to be the way women were supposed to be before? The beginning of all changes started in 1848 and lasted not just till 1920 but even until today. Many leaders such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Betty Friedan, Gloria Steimem and Sojourner Truth at the time were supported by both men and women to encourage women to conquer sexism and claim their rights. The whole purpose of the movement is to gain equality for all women. In 1972, Judy Brady wrote an essay “Why I Want a Wife” to reach out to all her readers that men want perfect wives to do everything for them. This essay by Judy Brady motivated the Women’s Rights Movement.
Women are simply just women and this perfectly fit in with the description in the essay written by Judy Brady. This literary piece is about how a wife ironically describe a perfect wife, how a wife should conduct herself in the eyes of a male figure. A wife’s job is to do whatever it takes to please her husband and if he unfortunately found a better woman then he can replace her. Even after being replaced, the wife will be responsible for the children and her husband is free to live his new life. Women are easily controlled, so everyone would want a wife. Women are just wives that need to know their roles of being perfect wives in their husbands’ eyes and the only goal in their lives is to make their so called husband happy. Even if they are going to be replaced whenever they are not needed or up to their men’s standards. With that being said, women always need to support their husbands and do everything for them. “I belong to that classification of people known was wives. I am A wife. And, not altogether incidentally, I am a mother” (Brady). The author is trying to say that she is nothing in the house except a wife and a mother who is expected to do everything for her husband. And so, she knows the role of being one. “I want a wife who will work and send me to school” (Brady). Being a mother and a wife is not enough; a wife needs to also work so her husband can do whatever it is that he needs to do. Of course, those are just a few needs that a man expects from his wife.
Being a wife is the harder than it looks. The purpose of this essay is to give a blatant unfair depiction of the conditions of the common “wife” during the time. The author uses a male point of view and their inherent selfishness to persuade her audience of both single and married women. She also tries to reach out to the males and show them how self-centered the husband is with their expectations. “Women are expected to do all type of things for their husbands but no one expect the men to do all these tasks” (Napikoski). Men are just lazy because they expect and want the wives to do all the duties in the house so they can focus on their goals. No matter what they are pursuing, women will always be behind them and give out emotional and physical support whenever needed. “Yea, I...

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