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The Lake Of Fire Essay

2682 words - 11 pages

The Lake of Fire has been a theological topic of great controversy. Cults such as the Jehovah’s Witnesses reject the doctrine of eternal punishment in the Lake of Fire, and instead they assert that the place is purely symbolic and that one should not take it literally. However, any good student of the Bible knows that although there is much figurative language throughout the Scriptures, he should always interpret the Bible in the literal sense. Therefore, the believer of God’s Word should consider the Lake of Fire a literal place of torment. The Bible is clear that such a place does exist, and that it is a place where many real people will meet their final fate. Moreover, the Bible is clear on who will go to the Lake of Fire, and why they will go there. This research will show who is destined for such a place and why. This research will also analyze Scripture erroneously taken out of context by those who claim that a believer can lose his salvation and end up in the Lake of Fire. Scripture quotations taken form the New American Standard Bible, NASB, unless otherwise noted.
What is the Lake of Fire? According to The New Unger’s Bible Dictionary, the Lake of Fire is synonymous with the Greek term Gehen’na, which carries the same meaning. The word Gehen’na in the Hebrew language is Hinnom. The Hebrew word Hinnom refers to the Valley of Hinnom, which was a place near the city of Jerusalem in the Old Testament that served as a garbage dump for refuse. The Valley of Hinnom was also a place where idolaters practiced the sacrifice of infants to the god Molech. The valley later became a place where the bodies of dead criminals were taken for incineration. Due to its hellish nature, the valley eventually became associated with the place where the wicked were sent as their final judgment. The New Testament gives various descriptions for the place that will be the final fate of the unbeliever. It is described as a “fiery hell” (Matt. 5:22). It is a place of “unquenchable fire, where their worm does not die…” (Mk. 9:43-44). It is a place of “outer darkness,” where there will be “weeping and gnashing of teeth” (Matt. 25:30), and a place of “eternal fire” (Matt. 25:41), and “eternal punishment” (Matt. 25:46). The Lord also describes it as a “furnace of fire” (Matt. 13:42). Furthermore, Paul calls it a place of eternal destruction, away from the presence of the Lord (2 Thess. 1:9). Jude describes it as “black darkness” (Jude 13). The Apostle John describes it as the “lake of fire that burns with fire and brimstone” (Rev. 21:8), where the ungodly are “tormented” (14:10), and where “they have no rest day and night” (14:11). Peter calls it “the day of judgment and destruction of ungodly men” (2 Peter 3:7). Furthermore, it is a place where there will be no comfort, companionship, fellowship, hope, mercy or love. The Lord and the Apostles gave very vivid descriptions of a place they considered very real.
Considering the very...

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