This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

The Land Occupies A Distinctive Time And Place In The Cultural Experience Of Australians, Indigenous And Non Indigenous

691 words - 3 pages

The Land occupies a distinctive time and place in the cultural experience of Australians, indigenous and non-indigenous."The Land" takes up a distinguishing place in the cultural knowledge of both indigenous and non-indigenous Australians. We see this through the works of many Australian artists. Indigenous Australian artists represent their cultural knowledge of the land through a contextual range of forms and styles which contrast from the ways in which it is represented by non-indigenous Australian artists. There are many artists who express this differing concept in their artworks, but four of the most prominent are, Frederick McCubbin with "Lost", Albert Namatjira with "Palm Valley," Sidney Nolan with "Kelly at the Mine" and Trevor Nickolls with "From Dreamtime to machine time."One artist who chose to reflect emotional aspects relating to the interaction of human beings with the Australian landscape was Frederick McCubbin. McCubbin, was a non-indigenous artist/impressionist who was born in West Melbourne 1855. His paintings were generally conscious and proudly nationalistic. Being nostalgic depictions of Australian bush scenery, McCubbin was most concerned with depicting realistically the inner beauties of his "land," the bush.In1886, McCubbin painted "Lost," his first large-scale narrative work combining the theme of anxiety and sadness with an interest in plein air landscape. McCubbin's first study of "Lost" is thought to have been inspired by Clara Crosbie, a 12 year old who was found alive after 3 weeks lost in the bush near Lilydale, Victoria in 1886. Becoming lost was one of the great dangers facing Australian children in pioneering days and was not uncommon. In his painting, McCubbin contrasts the image of a lone child against the enticing, but seemingly dangerous, beauty of the Australian bush. The work is strongly narrative in style, with all the elements focused around this theme. Our sympathy goes to the lost child. The lack of sky and the veil of branches and high grasses in the foreground help to increase the sense of isolation and encirclement of the little girl, reinforcing the work's main message about the hidden dangers of the Australian bush.For the painting "Lost," McCubbin combined a study of a child, whom he posed in the studio,...

Find Another Essay On The Land occupies a distinctive time and place in the cultural experience of Australians, indigenous and non-indigenous

Assimilation “Housing Indigenous Australians in the 1970s”

1977 words - 8 pages . For many Indigenous Australians, this experience negatively affected their obligations to family and community and their conventional pattern of life, because it was based as much on class relations and colonialism view. For this reason, white settlers was justifying the Indigenous people inadequacy participate in social life and / or to assimilate to racist terms, as demonstrating their genetic / biological unsuitability for “sophisticated

Indigenous Australians Essay

1616 words - 6 pages aboriginals finally had a right to vote and the United Nations had declared the rights of Indigenous people would be just as equal and would be free from any racism and discrimination. The Australian declaration towards reconciliation is about the unity between aboriginals and non- indigenous people and the respect for their heritage and to provide justice and equity to all Australians ( Australian Museum 2011). Aboriginal Identities Neville

Uncertain Reconciliation between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous people of Australia

682 words - 3 pages rights when European settlement occurred in Australia. As the Aboriginals were nomadic, the land that they lived on and moved around on soon became occupied by the Europeans. This disenabled the Aboriginals to sustain their ceremonial and cultural links with the land. Efforts to win Indigenous land back involved government policies and court acts. In 1976 Gough Whitlam introduced a Land Rights Act which made governments more aware of the issues

Outline the changing rights and freedoms of indigenous Australians throughout the 20th Century

967 words - 4 pages be allowed to have a say in the policies that affect them.The Self-determination Policy meant that the Aborigines became full, equal citizens like all other Australians. This was followed by the passing of the Racial Discriminations Act and Gough Whitlam symbolically returning land to the Indigenous owners in 1975 before the Aboriginal Land Rights Act was passed with some recommendations of the Woodward Commission.In the 90's the Mabo and Wik decisions were handed down with the Native Titles Act being passed. The latest breakthrough in Reconciliation was the recent apology - "Sorry" offered by newly elected Primer Minister Kevin Rudd to members of the Stolen Generation.

The White Australia policy and the treatment of indigenous Australians in the early 20th century demonstrate that Australia was a racist society

1153 words - 5 pages inferior. The language used towards the Chinese, Japanese and non-whites was a show of hostility and distrust towards them. The treatment of the indigenous Australians was inexcusable and outrageous in the way that White Australians treated them like they were not human. And the overall belief that non-whites are inferior and unequal. All These reasons come together to prove that in the early 20th Century Australia had a very racist society. Encarta

Health Issues of Indigenous Australians

2343 words - 9 pages -determination and “the emergence of Indigenous protest” (Psychology and Indigenous Australians, Foundations of Cultural Competence, 2009, pp.84) as well as the limiting factors of being part of a low socioeconomic status group and statistical health differences between Indigenous Australians and non-Indigenous Australians compared to other countries Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. By encompassing all of these details, we can begin to establish

Indigenous Rights and Land Claims Around the World

2283 words - 10 pages . Unlike Canada, the Colombian government does not have much experience dealing with native and indigenous tribes so they were very inexperienced with how to negotiate with them. Also, the act of making a resistance group amongst the U’wa was difficult because of their belief of non-tribal members being impure and talking to them would put them in a state of impurity. However, they knew the preservation and ownership of their land was on the line

Human Rights of Indigenous Australians

732 words - 3 pages the non-Indigenous population, higher unemployment rates than non-indigenous Australians, higher school dropout rates than non-indigenous Australians, etc. Health is a major issue in the Aboriginal society of Australia, Indigenous Australians receive lower levels of healthcare than the mainstream Australian. The life expectancy of the Indigenous male in 2003 was 59.4 years old and the female 64.8 years old, meaning that an Indigenous Australian

Traditionally Indigenous Australians

1490 words - 6 pages ). According to Foley (2010) the average mortality rate of Indigenous infants is 50% above that of non-Indigenous Australians; Indigenous life expectancy is 20 years less than non-Indigenous Australians. A high disease rate continues within the Indigenous culture and is unacceptable for a developing country; growth for improvement is deplorably slow and unjust (Foley, 2010). In remote areas housing for Indigenous Australians are overcrowded and

Indigenous People and Colonial Time

702 words - 3 pages At the end of European conquests which entailed the progressive entrenchment of the colonial system and its mechanisms of rule and exploitation received anything but acceptance from the indigenous people of those lands. The indigenous people rejected the notion of colonization and the plans that they had for them but this also lead to serious effects. This resistance could be seen in two ways: in rebellion or everyday forms of resistance

Policies Affecting Indigenous Australians

1571 words - 6 pages of Whitlam to the labour government. Self determination was brought in after many previous failing policies. It was the first policy that aimed at closing the gap between non-indigenous Australians and indigenous Australians; it was a new approach on how white people treat aboriginals. The aim was to end white paternalistic attitudes and practices and remove any feeling of racial superiority or the power over Indigenous Australians. Self

Similar Essays

Health Disparities Between Indigenous And Non Indigenous Australians

1981 words - 8 pages time, will close the gap between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians health status. Education is a major social determinant that can explain the disparities in health status between Indigenous Australians and Non-Indigenous Australians. Education can influence the individual’s lifestyle choices, employment status and opinion of health and wellbeing (Daly et al., 2010). The 2009 Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) showed that Indigenous

Compare And Contrast Nozick And Rawls Approaches To The Issue Of Indigenous Australians Land Rights

4314 words - 17 pages seems to deny Europeans' land rights in their'settler states'.A direct application of Nozicks' theory to aboriginal land title appears natural and straight forward. Indigenous Australians were the first occupants on the land who had legitimate entitlement through original acquisition. When European Settlement occurred in 1788 through forced dispossession, land was acquired contrary to the principles of just acquisition, therefore an injust

The Health Of Indigenous Australians Essay

2343 words - 9 pages -determination and “the emergence of Indigenous protest” (Psychology and Indigenous Australians, Foundations of Cultural Competence, 2009, pp.84) as well as the limiting factors of being part of a low socioeconomic status group and statistical health differences between Indigenous Australians and non-Indigenous Australians compared to other countries Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations. By encompassing all of these details, we can begin to establish

Indigenous Australians And The British Settlers

909 words - 4 pages Indigenous Australians have a deep and complicated connection with the land and its natural cycles. ‘Each group generally believes in a number of different deities, whose image is often depicted in some tangible, recognisable form. This form may be that of a particular landscape feature, an image in a rock art shelter, or in a plant or animal form.’ (Welch, n.d.) The Aboriginal Australians do not believe in animism, this is the belief that all