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The Life Of William Wordsworth. Essay

596 words - 2 pages

William Wordsworth was born in Cockermouth, Cumberland in the Lake District. His father was John Wordsworth who served as the attorney for Lord Lonsdale. His father was also the steward of the Lonsdale estate. When William was eight years old, his mother died and five years later his father died suddenly. When Williams father died, he left his five children in debt to Lord Lonsdale. Due to domestic problems, William and his beloved sister Dorothy grew apart. Dorothy was a very important person in Williams life, she had provided him with a valuable source of thought and impressions. With the help of his two uncles, William entered a local school and continued his studies and Cambridge University where he found a limited curriculum that interested him. As a writer William made his debut in 1787 when in published a sonnet in The European Magazine. That same year he entered St. John's college in Cambridge where he got his B.A. in 1791. During the previous summer vacation in 1790 he and his close college friend, Welshman Robert Jones, went through Revolutionary France and Switzerland. On his second trip to France, William had an affair with a French girl named Annette Vallon, who was the daughter of a French surgeon. William and Annette planned to Mary but the birth of their daughter, Caroline, forced to return to England due to the lack of funds. When the war between France and England broke out, William was unable to rejoin his wife and daughter in France until they had grown so far apart that they no longer desired to be together. Around this time Williams's friend Robert Calvert died and left him a good sum of money. William took the money and decided to settle down at Racedown,...

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