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The Lost Generation By Ernest Hemingway

646 words - 3 pages

The Lost Generation by Ernest Hemingway

Ernest Hemingway is one of the authors named “The Lost Generation.” He could not cope with post-war America; therefore, he introduced a new type of character in writing called the code hero. He was known to focus his novels around code heroes who struggle with the mixture of their tragic faults and the surrounding environment. Traits of a typical Hemingway code hero are stimulating surroundings, self-control, self-reliance, fearlessness, and strict moral rules. In Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, Pedro Romero is the character who maintains the typical code hero qualities, while Robert Cohn provides the antithesis of a code hero.

Pedro Romero comes closest to the embodiment of Hemingways’s code hero because of his strength, courage, and confidence. Brett is enchanted by this handsome, nineteen-year-old matador. He is a fearless figure who confronts death in his occupation; he is not afraid in the bullring and controls the bulls like a master. Pedro is the first man since Jake who causes Brett to lose her self-control. She says, “I can’t help it. I’m a goner now, anyway. Don’t you see the difference? I’ve got to do something I really want to do. I’ve lost my self respect.” In contrast, Pedro maintains his self-control in his first encounter with Brett. “He felt there was something between them. He must have felt it when Brett gave him her hand. He was being very careful.” Brett falls in love with Pedro as a hero. When Robert Cohn confronts Pedro because of his jealousy, Pedro demonstrates his confidence and strong will. Knocked down time and time again, Pedro rises each time refusing to be beaten. His controlled and dignified demeanor in an unusual situation contrasts sharply with Cohn’s fear and weakness. Pedro really wants to marry Brett because he wants to make sure she could never go away from him,...

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