This website uses cookies to ensure you have the best experience. Learn more

"The Lottery" By Shirley Jackson Essay

620 words - 2 pages

The various changes of environment always affect people’s life. Human being tended to select the best life styles to fit the nature, and to better adapted to the world. Darwin’s idea of adaptive changes applied to the short story “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson. In the story, the small town kept holding the lottery, while other towns refused to continue the lottery. The towns’ refusal illustrated that the villagers in those towns adapted well to the environment. The more changes the villagers made, the more comfortable their life would be, because they were moving to a way of better life. There were several reasons that the villagers wanted to quit the lottery in order to be comfortable in the environment.As the time passed over, the population of all the towns increased a lot. The villages’ population was “likely to keep on growing” in the future, since more and more people were moving toward the villages (197). The adaptive changes applied to the event that the villagers gave up the lottery. They might think that it was too difficult to hold the lottery with so many people. There must be problems on how to regulate the activity effectively. The crowded people might cause chaos. Jackson stated that “in some towns there were so many people that the lottery took two days and had to be started on June 2nd”, to illustrate the difficulty of holding the lottery. We could assume those towns, which had quit the lottery, had much more population than that.There were also new industries and businesses formed in the towns, as a result, people might have no time and energy to “devote to civic activities” (197). In the small town, there were only three people who held big businesses: Mr. Summers, Mr. Graves and Martin. These three...

Find Another Essay On "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson Essay

1711 words - 7 pages Shirley Jackson, born on December 14, 1916, devotes much of her life to the writing of short stories and novels. Some of these include The Sundial, The Haunting of Hill House, and We Have Always Lived in the Castle. Jackson's stories, inspiring and influential to most, are also controversial to some. Her most controversial story, published in 1948 in The New Yorker, is "The Lottery." The purpose for the writing of the story varies depending

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson Essay

707 words - 3 pages In ancient time, tradition usually helped people to find their way and to develop their personalities. However, tradition could blind people by being destructive and creating victims through social pressure. Shirley Jackson's story ''The Lottery'' portrays an ordinary New England village with average citizens engaged in a deadly rite, the annual selection of sacrificial a victim by means of a public lottery. Jackson proves her point by Miss

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

1317 words - 5 pages The Lottery by Shirley Jackson I was watching an episode of “The Simpsons” on TV the other day, and there was a craze around town because the Springfield Lottery was up to 130 million dollars. Bookstores were selling out of Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery”. Homer quickly threw the book into the fireplace when he realized that the book could not tell him how to win the lottery, that it was a book about time old traditions, barbaric, but

"The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson

1625 words - 7 pages villagers, along with her family members. "The Lottery," by Shirley Jackson, explores mankind's evil nature hiding behind traditions and rituals.The village's most powerful man, Mr. Summers owns a coal company and has more "time and energy to devote to civic activities" (474) than others. Mr. Summers is a complex character who wants to replace the black box and use paper instead of "chips of woods" (475). Mr. Summers is a lottery official, sworn

The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson

2133 words - 9 pages The 1940s in America sparked a new era in history concerning violence and warfare. The end of World War II brought the most horrific event in all of modern history to be witnessed by the world; the dropping of the Atomic Bomb, and further, the Holocaust. Born at the end of the Great War and living through this second World War, graphic imagery of the violence existing throughout her world filled the life of Shirley Jackson. Jackson’s husband

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson - 1077 words

1077 words - 4 pages The Lottery by Shirley Jackson Analyzation encompasses the application of given criteria to a literary work to determine how efficiently that work employs the given criteria. In the analyzation of short stories, the reader uses a brief imaginative narrative unfolding a single incident and a chief character by means of a plot, the details so compresses and the whole treatment so organized, a single impression results. To expose that

The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson

614 words - 2 pages because we didn't see any signs of violence throughout the story until the end. Bibliography: Works Cited Jackson, Shirley. "The Lottery." The Bedord Guide for College Writers, with Reader, Research Manual, and Handbook. 5th ed. By X. J. Kennedy, Dorothy M. Kennedy, and Sylvia A. Holladay. Boston: Bedford, 1999.

The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson

1551 words - 6 pages Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” is a story littered with warnings and subtext about the dangers a submissive society can pose. While the opening is deceptively cheery and light Jackson uses an array of symbols and ominous syntax to help create the apprehensive and grim tone the story ends with. Her portrayal of the town folk as blindly following tradition represents the world during World War II when people’s failure to not mindlessly accept

The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson - 822 words

822 words - 3 pages , the narrator does not interject moral judgment when reporting, so the tone is undisturbed. This is demonstrated by the following, “. . . , the whole lottery took less than two hours, so it could begin at ten o’ clock in the morning and still be through in time to allow the villagers to get home for noon dinner” (Jackson 137). The narrator does not stop to interpret or draw assumptions about the lottery. If told from any other perspective, the

The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson - 983 words

983 words - 4 pages "The Lottery" In "The Lottery" Shirley Jackson presents us with a shocking story guaranteed to outrage the reader. The author brings together the residents of a small village as they are gathered for an annual event referred to as the lottery. The families of the village are represented by their names on small pieces of paper, which are placed in a black box. The appointed townsperson oversees the drawing to determine who pulls the slip

"The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson

691 words - 3 pages The Lottery is such a complex work that even the author, Shirley Jackson couldn't explain it when questioned of its meaning. Division of Labor and Capitalism are huge themes in this story. And there is also the position that man is not yet so advanced that he still won't hesitate to perform acts of violence if it is acceptable to the general populace. There is the "monkey see monkey do" complex, which is also illustrated. And I could go on for

Similar Essays

The Lottery, By Shirley Jackson Essay 636 Words

636 words - 3 pages December 14, 1916. Her family moved East when she was seventeen, and she attended the University of Rochester. In 1948 The New Yorker published Jackson’s “The Lottery,” which brought forth the largest volume of mail ever received by the magazine, almost all hateful ( Shirley Jackson's Bio). “The Lottery” was published at a time when America was scrambling for conformity. Following World War II, the general public wanted to leave behind the horrors

The Lottery By Shirley Jackson Essay 937 Words

937 words - 4 pages “lottery”, he or she may think that someone will be rewarded with prize. But “The Lottery” By Shirley Jackson is different than what one thinks. In the story, a lottery is going to be conducted not like Mega Million or Powerball one play here. In the story, the person who wins the lottery is stoned to death instead of being rewarded with the prize. Tessie Hutchinson, the major character in the story, is wife of Mr. Bill Hutchinson and also a

The Lottery By Shirley Jackson Essay

768 words - 4 pages published was the story “the lottery”. This story was published on June 28, 1948 in the issue of the New Yorker. “It received a response that no New Yorker story had ever received” (Shirley Ann Jackson). “There was a very conventional way of reading it; One that touches upon a basic human truth and offers fairly little offense to anyone; people were criticizing it and characterizing it by “bewilderment, speculation, old fashioned abuse” (The bothers

The Lottery, By Shirley Jackson Essay 2292 Words

2292 words - 9 pages upset because it was as if “The Lottery” really hit home (Hicks 146). In an attempt to portray the graphic realities of life during this time period, Shirley Jackson cleverly expresses the grim facts with her use of literary techniques. Though greatly criticized for its inhumane pictorial of callous brutality, Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” illustrates through the characterization of Mrs. Tessie Hutchinson, the use of atmosphere, and allegorical