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The Lutheran Church And The Catholic Church

1052 words - 5 pages

“The heart overflows with gladness, and leaps and dances for the joy it has found in God. In this experience the Holy Spirit is active, and has taught us in the flash of a moment the deep secret of joy. You will have as much joy and laughter in life as you have faith in God.”  These are the words of Martin Luther, the man who started the Lutheran Church which soon led to the creation of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. The Church was officially formed on January 1, 1988 and was a combination of three branches of the Lutheran religion: the American Lutheran church, the Association of Evangelical Lutheran churches, and the Lutheran Church in America. In 2012 the ELCA had 3,950,924 ...view middle of the document...

During the Diet of Augsburg, these twenty-eight articles were presented to Emperor Charles V in both German and Latin. This is known as the Augsburg Confession. It was done not only to defend the Lutheran faith, but also to provide a statement of their theology which was acceptable to the Roman Catholics. Of the articles, twenty-one presented the Catholic faith as taught by the Lutherans and seven dealt with medieval Roman Catholic practices and beliefs which reformers believed were abuses. On August third of 1520, the Catholic theologians replied condemning thirteen articles, accepting nine without qualifications, and approving six with qualifications. This reply later became known as the Confutation. The Catholic Church disagrees with many of the teachings of the ELCA, but it continues to meet with them and discuss specific topics.
There are many differences between the Roman Catholic Church and the ELCA, however there are two main ones. The Catholic Church believes that to reach salvation one must have faith and do good works. In contrast, the ELCA believes salvation can be reached through faith alone. Yet James chapter two verse seventeen states, “In the same way, faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead.” Another difference between the two churches is the views on the pope. The Catholic Church sees him as a representative of Christ, whereas the ELCA believes that he takes the place of Christ. The ELCA has many more beliefs which strongly differ from the Catholic Church such as: there are human errors and contradictions in the Bible, the story of creation is a myth, and what Jesus says in the Bible was truly made up by those who wrote the Bible. There is one particular difference which is considered a very powerful moral issue in today’s society: abortion.
The ELCA believes abortion is acceptable under certain conditions. These include: the pregnancy is life threatening to the mother, both parties did not willingly participate in sexual intercourse, or there is a fetal abnormality. In the eyes of the pro-life Catholic Church all life is sacred and abortion...

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