The Mark Of Race Essay

1106 words - 4 pages

Race has proven to be more than the color of someone’s skin. Race, through personal experience, is stigmas and stereotypes, limits and control, power, and opportunity. Race is about shades, hues, and pigments justifying bias actions. Does one race, because of something that cannot be changed, have an advantage over another? Does something as simple as the color dictate how one is seen in society and limit what one can and cannot do?
We classify one another in four or five classes based on features and judge one another’s internal abilities based on race (Adelman and Herbes-Sommers 2003). We are quick to simplify the complexity of an individual based on physical features and what we assume to be correct. As stated in episode one, there is nothing biological to justify race (Adelman and Herbes-Sommers 2003). There is no chromosome or trait that can be singled out to say a group or a race is better at any particular activity. But, as a society we want to use and manipulate science to say one race is superior. The same ‘science’ that proves positive qualities in the dominate race, is used to diminish the equity in the minorities time and hard work in their craft. African Americans are overall known to excel at athletics. White Americans wanted to link race to athletic ability (Adelman and Herbes-Sommers 2003). Those in power, the dominate race, want to demean the hard work of an individual in a minority race. The majorities say there is a certain trait that allows ‘their kind’ to be good at a particular activity, not that the individually worked hard and put in the rigorous hours to be successful.
Race is used to quickly classify a person and determine how one should interact with another. There is nothing easier than looking at someone, having preconceived notions and the individual fulfill the stigma. But, race in America equates power. To suppress a person after finding out information about them is difficult. The quickest way is to use past history about an entire race, place someone in their ‘respective’ category, and continue to act superior. As stated in the film, a story of race was created to justify how all men are not treated equal (Adelman and Strain 2003). This statement resonates with me because we use race to validate negative things different races say and do to one another. I rarely hear race in the media in a positive light. Race has become a crutch for those who are in power, to stay in power while keeping their foot on those beneath them.
The history of racism in America has skewed how we interact with one another within our own race. As history has shown, men began to denounce their race to simply be seen as equal to the white man (Adelman and Strain 2003). People within the same race were treated different based on skin tone. The same privilege has carried over into today’s modern racism. Within the black community, there is hostility between people of different shades of brown. There comes unspoken...

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