The Marshall Court Essay

1726 words - 7 pages

The life of every American citizen, whether they realize it or not, is influenced by one entity--the United States Supreme Court. This part of government ensures that the freedoms of the American people are protected by checking the laws that are passed by Congress and the actions taken by the President. While the judicial branch may have developed later than its counterparts, many of the powers the Supreme Court exercises required years of deliberation to perfect. In the early years of the Supreme Court, one man’s judgement influenced the powers of the court systems for years to come. John Marshall was the chief justice of the Supreme Court from 1801 to 1835, and as the only lasting Federalist influence in a newly Democratic-Republican government, he and his fellow justices sought to perpetuate their Federalist principles in the United States’ court system. In one of the most memorable court cases of all time--the case of Marbury v. Madison-- Marshall established the idea of judicial review and strengthened the power of the judicial branch in the government. Abiding by his Federalist ideals, Marshall decided cases that would explicitly limit the power of the state government and broaden the strengths of the national government. Lastly, the Marshall Court was infamous for determining the results of cases that dealt with the interpretation of the Constitution and the importance of contracts in American society. The Marshall Court, over the span of a mere three decades, managed to influence the life of every American citizen even to this day by impacting the development of the judicial branch, establishing a boundary between the state and national government, and making declarations on the sanctity of contracts ("The Marshall Court").
Students from a young age are taught that the judicial branch is given the task of determining the constitutionality of laws created by Congress. Surprisingly enough, however, this power was not secured by the Supreme Court until 1803 when the case of Marbury v. Madison was heard. As one of his last acts as president, John Adams passed the Judiciary Act of 1801, establishing new circuit courts and then filling all the judgeship positions with Federalists. Jefferson had said that the Federalists “retreated into the judiciary as a stronghold” and hoped to integrate their ideals into the rulings of the courts. When the commissions for the judges were delivered in the last hours of Adams’ presidency, certain people did not receive their paperwork, including William Marbury. In December of 1801, Marbury asked the Supreme Court to issue a writ of mandamus and force James Madison--the new Secretary of State under Jefferson--to give him his commission. The Supreme Court, with John Marshall as the chief justice, agreed to hear the case, but they were soon met with a dilemma. If the Court ordered Madison to award Marbury the judgeship, Madison could simply ignore the decision with the support of President Jefferson. However,...

Find Another Essay On The Marshall Court

        Thurgood Marshall was the first black man ever to be

1129 words - 5 pages Thurgood Marshall was the first black man ever to be appointed to the United States Supreme Court. Marshall was one the finest and most recognized civil rights leaders of the 20th century. Marshall had a lot of liberal views that brought much controversy upon him. Marshall did what he thought would make for a better country and most certainly a more civil and obedient America. Although he faced many challenges, he overcame them to become

Easley MLA BIO Essay

1252 words - 6 pages Why was Thurgood Marshall Famous? Thurgood Marshall was born on July 2, 1908, in Baltimore, MD. He was born to his Mother Norma Marshall and Father William Marshall. In his lifetime he was a civil Right Activist, Lawyer, Circuit Court Judge & Solicitor General, and a Supreme Justice. He died at the age 84 on January 24, 1993. He was married twice in his lifetime first to Vivien "Buster" Burey till her death in 1955 then to Cecilia Suyat till his

Thurgood Marshall's Impact on Today's Society - American History - Essay

1212 words - 5 pages , suppressing racial discrimination, and becoming the first black Supreme Court justice. Growing up, Thurgood Marshall experienced segregation. His mother taught at a segregated elementary school, where she earned far less than white teachers. “Until 1954, racial segregation in education was not only legal but was required in seventeen states and permissible in several others” (Johnson, David). Due to segregation laws, he was not allowed to attend his

Thurgood Marshall

1050 words - 4 pages Thurgood Marshall was the first black man ever to be appointed to the United States Supreme Court. Marshall was one the finest and most recognized civil rights leaders of the 20th century. Marshall had a lot of liberal views that brought much controversy upon him. Marshall did what he thought would make for a better country and most certainly a more civil and obedient America. Although he faced many challenges, he overcame them to become one of

Marbury v. Madison Analysis

647 words - 3 pages Untitled Madison or Marbury: A Judicial Dilemma By, Robert Y. Sayegh There have been many occasions in history were judicial review has been used in the Supreme Court, but perhaps the most important occasion is Marbury vs. Madison. As President Adams was preparing to leave office, he was appointing new justices to the Judicial Branch of the U.S. Government, but Secretary of State Marshall and his staff did not mail the appointment

The Early Accomplishments of John Marshall

2646 words - 11 pages and physical attacks of society in defense of what one considers morally proper. On January 27th, 1801 the Senate confirmed John Marshall?s nomination. He took his seat on February 4th, 1801 and would lead there for the next thirty-four years. This position and the Court were thought to be harmless but Marshall would later shape the Court into a respectable forum that would become a political battlefield. The first three cases John Marshall

Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary

1720 words - 7 pages of Marshall beginning with his childhood background and schooling, then to his revolutionary career within the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Legal Defense Fund (LDF) and the Supreme Court, and concludes with Thurgood Marshall’s legacy and impact on the Civil Rights Movement. Named after his dad’s brother, Thoroughgood Marshall was born in the summer of 1908. Thoroughgood Marshall shortened his name to

William Marshall

1240 words - 5 pages -hearted), and John. William was born around 1147 to John Marshall and Sybil of Salisbury during the reign of King Stephen. His father, John Marshall, served as a court officer and eventually earned the status of a minor baron. John Marshall was a shrewd soldier and a skilled negotiator. He was the premier example of lordship in William’s life. William’s relationship with his father would be brief and he would never experience him beyond his

Supreme Court Cases - Marbury vs Madison

649 words - 3 pages request. It is later discovered that it is unconstitutional for the Supreme Court to issue a writ of mandamus, or a court order through the Judiciary Act of 1789 which established a federal district court for each state.Chief Justice Marshall wanted the Court to be able to decide if laws passed by Congress were constitutional. Whether the Court had this power of judicial review, the power to decide if laws made by congress are allowed by the

John Marshall: The Great Chief Justice

611 words - 2 pages key to the laws of the land, and in courts as the supreme custodians of those laws--views that would influence his shaping of the Supreme Court.' Marshall believed that the Constitution should not be interpreted as strict, allowing the government to become more powerful.Possibly the most important case of its time was Marbury vs. Madison in 1803. In this case, John Marshall's ruling set an extremely important precident. His ruling declared that a

constitutional law

1066 words - 4 pages Constitutional Law Marbury v. Madison      Marbury v. Madison, one of the first Supreme Court cases asserting the power of judicial review, is an effective argument for this power; however, it lacks direct textual basis for the decision. Marshall managed to get away with this deficiency because of the silence on many issues and the vague wording of the Constitution. During the early testing period when few precedents

Similar Essays

John Marshall And The Supreme Court

843 words - 3 pages Chief Justice John Marshall made the Supreme Court what it is today with the help of the case of Marbury vs. Madison. He wrote the decision for "the most monumental case ever decided by any court in any country" (Glennon). Judicial review, and Chief Justice John Marshall, earned the Supreme Court the respect and prestige it carries today. Marshall had several qualities that gave him the power and respect to succeed in making a

The Controversial, First Black Supreme Court Justice: Thurgood Marshall         Thurgood

1180 words - 5 pages The Controversial, First Black Supreme Court Justice: Thurgood Marshall Thurgood Marshall was the first black man ever to be appointed to the United States Supreme Court. Marshall was one the finest and most recognized civil rights leaders of the 20th century. Marshall had a lot of liberal views that brought much controversy upon him. Marshall did what he thought would make for a better country and most certainly a more civil and

John Marshall: The Most Influential Chief Justice Of The Supreme Court

682 words - 3 pages John Marshall: The Most Influential Chief Justice of the Supreme Court In the beginning years of the United States Constitution, the Supreme Court was a struggling institution due to the lack of effectiveness of the Chief Justices and was not highly regarded by the executive and legislative branches of the government. The third Chief Justice in only twelve years, John Marshall put an end to the Supreme Court’s lack of influence after his

European Court Of Justice Decision On Marshall Case

755 words - 4 pages Following the argument, which a directive may not rely in an action against an individual, it should be noted that according to Article 189 of the EEC Treaty, the obligatory structure of a directive that includes the ground for the probability of relying on the directive before municipal court, exists only in alliance to ‘each member state to which it is addressed’. Directive on its own may not be able to establish obligations on an individual