The Matrix: Technology Fears Of A Dystopian World

772 words - 4 pages

Millions of people flock to the movie theater year after year on a quest to be entertained. Even a mediocre movie has the ability to take the audience to another place, escaping the realities of their own life, even if for just a few short hours. Some movies are simply pure entertainment. And then, there are those movies that provoke conversation long after the film has been viewed. Despite the popularity of the recent films The Hunger Games and Divergence, the dystopian theme in film is not a new one. The Matrix shows a society where humans exist without any freedom. The film, not only entertaining but thought provoking as well, paints a world with two different dimensions, a world ...view middle of the document...

Their previous lives have been taken over by technology. They were literally slaves to the programs. Technology dominates over nature. There is no longer a natural order to the world. Through the war against AI and humans, machinery replaced natural resources and earth became a barren wasteland. This is a slow building mimic of the world today. Machines and technology control the natural resources in the world: water flow, electricity, natural gas. If and when there is a major failure, society has become so dependent upon the technology that controls these resources that the result would be catastrophic.
The fear of technology is another reoccurring theme through the film. The controlling program traces telephone calls allowing the program to eliminate any threats to its dominance over humans. The tracing of phone calls is how the program is able to fight against the resistance movement. Like the film, today’s society sees an increasing occurrence of governments tracing and listening in on the private conversations of its civilians and watching over people’s movements on the internet.
Lastly, The Matrix depicts a society in which its stabilization is achieved through virtual reality. Life is essential dependent upon technology, and strangely it is human...

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