The Mayor Of Casterbridge 2 Essay

990 words - 4 pages

Literature: The Mayor of Casterbridge Can it be said that Henchard's downfall is all due to 'some great error?' Some may believe that it is a penance for selling Susan, but this would be to take Newson out of the equation, who, it must be said, is just as guilty of this act as Henchard. I believe that Henchard is totally blameless for his downfall, to use a bad pun that will become apparent later, it is in his nature. It is my belief that Henchard is a personification of nature. It is obvious that his life has completed a revolution but when you look closely, you can see that Henchard's life resembles the seasons.Our first image of Henchard is one of winter, his clothing is described as "…a short jacket of brown corduroy…white horn buttons…and a straw hat overlaid with black glazed canvas." Black, brown and white conjure images of the countryside in the heart of winter for me. Hechard's life is in a rather bad point but things start looking up when he sells Susan, it is at this point that he moves into spring. We are told little of what happens between Susan's sale and when she comes looking for him but I would say that during this period Henchard passes through spring as he gives up liquor and moves into summer when he becomes mayor. When we next see Henchard he is on the brink of autumn, his progression down through the social strata is very autumnal as his creeps, inch by inch, towards the inevitable. When he reaches the lowest of the low he does not stay in the town and sponge off Elizabeth-Jane and Farfrae, he follows the yearning of his soul and returns to nature. When he dies he is back in winter but just on the verge of spring, exactly like the start of the book.Just having a life resembling the seasons would not immediately lead me to think that Henchard is closely linked to nature, his very character seems natural. The best example of his naturalness is when Farfrae introduces the rowing machine. Henchard is opposed to it and wishes to stay with the tried and true, yet somewhat chaotic, seed lip. Henchard is, like nature, chaotic and unpredictable. He is able to disgrace a man while keeping his mother well stocked with firewood. Henchard's success can be attributed to his closeness to nature much more than his business acumen.If Henchard's nature makes him fail, then it may be asked why Farfrae succeeds. I believe that Farfrae is the antithesis of Henchard; he is very close to science, machines and the modern world. While Henchard runs his business with "you shall ha'et" and "I'll do't," Farfrae runs his with "letters and ledgers" and also his rowing machine. The rowing machine is the best example in the novel of how Farfrae runs his business, it precisely places the seeds...

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