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The Meaning Of Ecology And Ecosystems

1235 words - 5 pages

The meaning of Ecology is the connection that exists between living organisms and their environment. From the largest animal on Earth to the smallest, they all share our world with us. The ecosystem is connected by the flow of matter and energy and as organisms eat and dispose of matter it supplies them to sustain life. Across the planet various densities of uneven configurations accumulate minerals and nutrients.
For example “Energy necessary for all life processes reaches the earth in the form of sunlight. By photosynthesis green plants convert the light energy into chemical energy, and carbon dioxide and water are transformed into sugar and stored in the plant.” Para 3 Columbia Encyclopedia:
Ecology Retrieved from http://www.answers.com/topic/ecology-1#ixzz2kYJo0zPj

An animal that eats plants acquires some of the stored energy by consuming the plant; Herbivorous are then used for food by meat eaters and then they pass on the energy to them.

Ecosystems can be as small as a tide pool or a rotting log or as large as a body of water, forest or desert. Each system can consist of a community of plants and animals and this community is sustained by raw materials, chemical elements and water. Each community is surrounded by soil, water, climate and other conditions of the environment. An example of an ecosystem is a pond it supports a community of fish, frogs, insects and plants. Basic food is small organisms and plankton for the fish to consume. If the ecosystem does not maintain a balance it can weaken and the species will suffer. The systems are affected by fire, disease and severe climate changes not including predators and man such as building, pollution and mining.
The associations between plants and animals and their environment are governed by simple tasks, while others are very complex, but they can all be grouped into five mutually supporting principles:
• Tropic levels (feeding relationships)
• Energy flow (sunlight)
• Material cycling (water, nitrogen, carbon)
• Limiting factors (physical and chemical)
• Constant change (succession and evolution) para 5 Ecology & Ecosystems pdf
There are different levels of feeding relationships in an ecosystem and to understand how they work and affect the ecosystem we need to understand how energy flows. There are two types of Energy flow they are either producers or consumers. It starts with the producers which are green plants that get their energy from the sun they require water, carbon dioxide and nitrates from the ground. Plants provide protein to the plant eaters a substance they both need to survive. Consumers have a primary and a secondary the primary are the plant eaters they get their food from plants for example there are deer and cows. The secondary consumer are the animals that eat meat, they get their food from the plant eaters for example the mountain lion and hawks. These meat eaters prey on smaller weaker animals because they are easier to catch; they use the senses...

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