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The Meaning Of Horror In Joseph Conrad´S Heart Of Darkness

931 words - 4 pages

In the book the heart of darkness by Joseph Conrad Mr. Kurtz last words were “ the horror, the horror”. There are many ways to look at what might have been going through his head or what would have been the vision he was experiencing as the book describes it. One way to look at it is that he is recollecting on the way he tried to bring civilization to Africa. Another opinion that is expressed is that he was looking back on what he did as to unintentionally becoming a savage. In all reality I think it was his looking back on what he set out to do and how he did it and where it got him and what he became. And the fact that the lack of society helped morph him into what he was trying to ...view middle of the document...

He started off fine but when Marlow got to him he was sick but he had been running around with this tribe near a lake and they would take ivory from surrounding villages and then Kurtz’s would send it down the river in canoes and say it was his. He had heads on spears outside his station to keep rebels away. He would go up on the hills and dance around fires and participate in rituals with this tribe of savages that looked at him like he was a supernatural power a god even. He accepted that and essentially in my opinion fed on it. He didn’t try to stop the way they treated him and the way they thought of him he just let it go. The way the tribe reacted to the steamboat throwing spears and shooting arrows at it because they didn’t want them to take Kurtz away from them, truly showed what they thought of him and how high of a pedestal they put him on.

The last would be the way I look at it which is a little bit of both put together. I think he was looking back upon his goals and how they turned into something obscure from what he was intending. I think he looked back and saw how he slowly progressed into the savage that he was trying to get rid of in Africa. He probably saw how that everyone has animal nature and that when out of society where no one acknowledges the way you act like a gentlemen. He probably looked back at what he was and saw the changes...

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